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In Python 3.3, is there any way to make a part of text in a string subscript when printed?

e.g. H₂ (H and then a subscript 2)

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1  
Do you mean in plain text, or HTML, or something else? Also, are you only interested in subscripting numerals? – Zero Piraeus Jun 24 '14 at 16:36
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If all you care about are digits, you can use the str.maketrans() and str.translate() methods:

>>> SUB = str.maketrans("0123456789", "₀₁₂₃₄₅₆₇₈₉")
>>> SUP = str.maketrans("0123456789", "⁰¹²³⁴⁵⁶⁷⁸⁹")
>>> "H2SO4".translate(SUB)
'H₂SO₄'
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+1. @Sam: To emphasize, the only subscript that can directly be done like this requires the existence of the special characters (in Unicode). This way, the 2 and 4 in 'H₂SO₄' are actually different characters than 2 and 4. Yet, it is rather unusual way to implement the subscript and superscript. As Bakuriu mentioned in stackoverflow.com/a/24391972/1346705, the usual way is to use something more than a viewer capable to display Unicode characters. – pepr Jun 24 '14 at 21:00

The output performed on the console is simple text. If the terminal supports unicode (most do nowadays) you can use unicode's subscripts. (e.g H₂) Namely the subscripts are in the ranges:

  • 0x208N for numbers, +, -, =, (, ) (N goes from 0 to F)
  • 0x209N for letters

For example:

In [6]: print(u'H\u2082O\u2082')
H₂O₂

For more complex output you must use a markup language (e.g. HTML) or a typesetting language (e.g. LaTeX).

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They end up upside down twos – Sam Jun 24 '14 at 16:43
    
@Sam ? No. The subscript 2 is just a small 2 put a bit lower. – Bakuriu Jun 24 '14 at 16:46

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