Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code (simplified for clarity) which is called by $PROMPT_COMMAND after every command:

function previous_command_status() 
{
    exit_code=$?;
    if [ $exit_code -eq 0 ]; then
        echo "Command successful"
    else
        echo "Command failed with exit code $exit_code"
    fi
}

The problem is, it seems the [ $exit_code -eq 0 ] part is changing the exit code, so I am unable to use or store the exit code after the command has finished running. For example:

$ ./failing_script.sh
Command failed with exit code 255
$ echo $?;
1   # this is the exit code of the 'if' statement, not of 'bad'

I cannot "pass the value along", because if I add the line exit $exit_code inside the function, the terminal window closes immediately.

Is there any way for me to "preserve" the exit code of the previous command, or run a set of commands in such a way that they won't modify the exit value?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't preserve it. Even if you use case statements echo would still alter it. However you can put it back with return:

exit_code=$?;
if [ $exit_code -eq 0 ]; then
    echo "Command successful"
else
    echo "Command failed with exit code $exit_code"
fi
return "$exit_code"

You can use another global variable to store the code however.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm used to Java and ECMA-based languages; looks like I really need to read up on how return is used in Bash. –  IQAndreas Jun 24 '14 at 20:19
    
Why did you put quotes around $exit_code, isn't it always going to be an integer value (without spaces)? –  IQAndreas Jun 24 '14 at 20:20
    
@IQAndreas Just a good practice even if IFS never gets a numerical value. –  konsolebox Jun 25 '14 at 9:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.