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Consider the case of having two pure virtual classes, say X and Y. Y specifies a pure virtual method that returns a smart pointer to an instance of X (e.g. virtual unique_ptr<X> getX() const = 0). This is done so that subclasses of Y can return whatever implementation of X they desire.

However, this means that a user has to be aware that upon calling getX(), they should expect to work with an instance of unique_ptr<X> (not ideal). This is readily fixed by wrapping unique_ptr<X> in a class as in the following example:

#include <iostream> // cout, endl
#include <memory>   // unique_ptr

using namespace std;

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

struct X {
    virtual void exampleMethod() = 0;
};

struct XCloneable : public X {
    typedef unique_ptr<XCloneable> P;
    virtual P clone() const = 0;
};

class XWrapper : public X {
    XCloneable::P p;

public:
    XWrapper(XCloneable::P p) noexcept : p(move(p)) {}
    XWrapper(const XWrapper &that) noexcept : p(that.p->clone()) {}
    XWrapper &operator=(const XWrapper &that) noexcept {
        p = that.p->clone();
        return *this;
    }
    XWrapper(XWrapper &&that) noexcept : p(move(that.p)) {
    }
    XWrapper &operator=(XWrapper &&that) noexcept {
        p = move(that.p);
        return *this;
    }

    virtual void exampleMethod() { p->exampleMethod(); }
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

struct XX : public XCloneable {
    virtual void exampleMethod() { cout << "XX" << endl; }
    virtual XCloneable::P clone() const { return XCloneable::P(new XX); }
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

struct Y {
    virtual XWrapper getX() = 0;
};

struct YY {
    virtual XWrapper getX() { return XWrapper(XCloneable::P(new XX)); }
};

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main() {
    YY yy;
    auto x = yy.getX();

    x.exampleMethod();

    return 0;
}

However, this is quite verbose, and has to be written for each pure virtual class similar to X. I imagine it would not be too difficult to automatically generate wrappers such as the above systematically, although I would prefer to not run my code through anything other than the usual C preprocessor (although more exotic preprocessing solutions are welcome/interesting).

Is there a way to handle this scenario systematically?

share|improve this question
    
You are returning a custom wrapper to a unique_ptr to an instance of X. What prevents you from simply returning a X&? You say "This is done so that subclasses of Y can return whatever implementation of X they desire." Returning X& will allow that too. –  Drew Dormann Jun 24 '14 at 19:21
1  
Seems a bit like over-engineering. If I were you, I'd lean back and consider a completely different approach to the higher-level problem you are really trying to solve here. –  Christian Hackl Jun 24 '14 at 19:21
    
@DrewDormann: Returning X& does achieve that effect, but it does not give ownership of X to the caller (e.g. X &getX() { X x; return x; } returns a reference to stack memory). –  par Jun 24 '14 at 19:28
    
Not quite understand why your way is simpler than just returning smart pointer. When your user is working with unique_ptr or shared_ptr, he should be aware of ownership of the object returned. Your code just make it hidden and so more complicated. –  Slava Jun 24 '14 at 19:32
    
You haven't explained why unique_ptr is not ideal. However, shared_ptr is the other alternative that should work as well as XWrapper. –  R Sahu Jun 24 '14 at 19:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The pattern you're talking about is an Abstract Factory. I'm really not sure why most of the code in your question exists though... Here is an example of an abstract factory implementation which should do what you need:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

class X
{
public:
    virtual void exampleMethod() = 0;
};

class MyX : public X
{
public:
    void exampleMethod() override
    {
        std::cout << "Calling MyX::exampleMethod()";
    }
};

class XFactory
{
public:
    virtual std::unique_ptr<X> createX() = 0;

    static XFactory* getInstance()
    {
        return m_instance.get();
    }

    static void setInstance(std::unique_ptr<XFactory> instance)
    {
        m_instance = move(instance);
    }

private:
    static std::unique_ptr<XFactory> m_instance;
};

std::unique_ptr<XFactory> XFactory::m_instance = std::unique_ptr<XFactory>();

class MyXFactory : public XFactory
{
public:
    std::unique_ptr<X> createX() override
    {
        return std::unique_ptr<X>(new MyX);
    }
};

int main()
{
    // Call setInstance with different XFactory implementations to get back
    // different implementations of X.
    std::unique_ptr<XFactory> xFactory(new MyXFactory);
    XFactory::setInstance(move(xFactory));

    std::unique_ptr<X> x = XFactory::getInstance()->createX();

    x->exampleMethod();

    return 0;
}

This example outputs:

Calling MyX::exampleMethod()

I don't see that you need a wrapper at all although there is no reason you couldn't return one from MyXFactory::createX() as long as it extends X.

EDIT:

I just re-read your question, why is it not ideal for the caller to know they are dealing with a unique_ptr? I would think that it is the most ideal. By giving them a unique_ptr you are explicitly saying to them: you own this now.

share|improve this answer
    
See my comment above. –  par Jun 24 '14 at 22:33
    
Your comment about not wanting to return a reference because it doesn't give ownership to the caller? This solution does give ownership to the caller. I'm really not sure what your getting at, could you give more detail? –  Gary Buyn Jun 25 '14 at 2:45
    
Sorry, I meant as an answer to your question about unique_ptr being most ideal: "unique_ptr is, in my opinion, ideal for most scenarios. It has the right ownership semantics. My concern is that I am writing a library whose target audience may be unfamiliar with C++11 concepts and I want to expedite adoption. I thought by hiding as much of the C++11 (without necessarily losing any of the semantics), I could do this." –  par Jun 25 '14 at 2:48
1  
I think you need to make a decision one way or the other - use c++11 or don't. If someone runs into a problem with your code as you've presented it, it'll be far harder to troubleshoot than unique_ptr by itself. –  Gary Buyn Jun 25 '14 at 4:19

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