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I am creating a Volume value type and so far so good but when I overrode the multiplication operator and wrote a unit test, if the test fails instead of getting the expected and actual amounts I get the full qualified type name.

There's not much in the code:

private decimal amount;

public Volume(decimal value)
{
   amount = value;
}

public static implicit operator Volume(decimal value)
{
   return new Volume(value);
}

//... continue same methods with all number types

public static Volume operator *(Volume left, decimal right)
{
   return new Volume(left.amount * right);
}

With this code if I write a failing test instead of getting the expected and actual amount failing message I get:

Message: Assert.AreEqual failed. Expected: <MyTypes.Utilities.Volume>. Actual: <MyTypes.Utilities.Volume>.

I tried adding the following:

public static implicit operator Decimal(Volume value)
{
    return value.amount;
}

Not only this did not work but now the test that proves the type can be initialized with a decimal amount fails with the same message:

[TestMethod]
public void VolumeTypeGetsInitializedByDecimalValue()
{
    Decimal value = 123456781.1235657789464356m;

    Volume volume = value;

    Assert.AreEqual(value, volume);
}

This is the first time I try to do this so I am not sure why it is behaving this way. Any guidance is appreciated.

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3  
It doesn't look like you provided an implementation of the equals operator –  Pete Baughman Jun 25 at 0:03
1  
You should override ToString as well. The test framework is calling ToString which is the type name by default. –  mike z Jun 25 at 0:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First way is to replace

Assert.AreEqual(value, volume);

with:

Assert.AreEqual((Volume)value, volume);

another way is to replace assert string with:

Assert.IsTrue(value.Equals(volume), string.Format("It was expected to get '{0}' but got '{1}'.", volume, value));

and override ToString to be like:

public override String ToString(){
    return amount.ToString();
}

Update

To make things "right", additionally to overriding ToString method I also do recommend to override Equals and GetHashCode methods with marking amount field as readonly:

private readonly decimal amount;

public bool Equals(Volume other)
{
    return amount == other.amount;
}

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    return obj is Volume ? Equals((Volume)obj) : base.Equals(obj);
}

public override int GetHashCode()
{
    return amount.GetHashCode();
}
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1  
I checked all the stuff I wrote and it worked. So in case of downvoting please explain the mistake to let me know where's is the mistake. I like feedback :) –  alex.b Jun 25 at 0:33

To see the decimal value enclosed by your Volume class when it is printed by your test, just implement an override of ToString():

public override String ToString(){
    return amount.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the downvote? I answered the question directly. –  Jonathan Wilson Jun 25 at 0:09
    
I don't know who downvoted. This seems like the right answer. –  John Wu Jun 25 at 0:14
    
I didn't downvote, but simply overriding ToString() does not work for me. Are we both talking about mstest framework? –  alex.b Jun 25 at 0:29
    
Nope, the above is a solution to this problem when using NUnit. Maybe you should mention your testing framework in your question. –  Jonathan Wilson Jun 25 at 0:34

Assert.AreEqual calls object.Equals, implimented like this. First it compares 2 objects with object.ReferenceEquals, if they are not equal it checks if one of them null and if not it calls Equals method of one of objects.

static bool Equals(object a, object b)
{
    if(ReferenceEquals(a, b)
        return true;
    if(a == null || b == null)
        return false;
    return a.Equals(b);
}

In c# all value (struct) type inherit from ValueType, which overrides Object Equals method. First it compares types, in your case it is Volume and decimal, so Equals returns false. For equal types it compares field values via reflection. So if you want Assert.AreEqual to compare Volume and decimal, you'll have to override Equals like this:

public override bool Equals(object obj)
{
    if (obj is decimal)
    {
        return amount == (decimal) obj;
    }
    if (obj is Volume)
    {
        return amount == ((Volume) obj).amount;
    }
    return false;
}

Still it is possible that Assert.AreEqual(Decimal, Volume) and Assert.AreEqual(Volume, Decimal) will produce different results, so I'd recomend you to test with Assert.IsTrue(Volume.Equals(Decimal)).

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The problem is with the command Assert.AreEqual. Although I cannot speak directly to how the implementation works (documentation), I believe that the function is using the operator ==.

In order for your volume to work correctly with Assert.AreEqual you will need to define the operators == and !=.

EDIT: Found documentation that suggests that Assert.AreEqual implements IEquatable See here

Such as

public static bool operator !=(Volume valA, Volume valB)
{
    return valA.amount != valB.amount;
}

public static bool operator ==(Volume valA, Volume valB)
{
    return valA.amount == valB.amount;
}

Note: You will also need to implement Equals & GetHashCode (or use IEquatable)

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