Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what will the program behave when they have two exceptions. And none of them have been caught yet. what type of handler will be called . lets say both the exceptions were of different type. i apologize if i am not clear but i feel i have made myself clear enough. thank you!!!

what if the try block throws an exception and try block is exited which destroyes all the automatic variables.Lets say one was an automatic object and its destructor again threw an exception.Now we have two uncaught exception.My question is based on this fact. thank you!!

share|improve this question
1  
Please explain exactly what is happening with the OS and the compiler. –  compie Mar 13 '10 at 20:08
3  
+1 to keep afloat. This might not be an uncommon question from those first approaching exception handling. Good chance to clear up confusion by this thread. –  John K Mar 13 '10 at 20:13
    
Can you explain more on your question? If the exception is from the OS, why would you care because the OS is going to handle it. And if its from a compiler, it depends on the compiler (but mostly only one exception can be thrown) –  matrixtheone Mar 13 '10 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It depends entirely on the language. However, in all the languages I know there can't ever be multiple exceptions at the same time (in the same thread). If an exception has been thrown, it travels up the call stack until it's caught, with no code executing during this time. If the exception is not caught, the program crashes before another can be thrown. If it is caught, the exception is no longer "active" and if the handler throws a new exception, the old one is forgotten.

share|improve this answer
    
what if the try block throws an exception and try block is exited which destroyes all the automatic variables.Lets say one was an automatic object and its destructor again threw an exception.Now we have two uncaught exception.My question is based on this fact. thank you!! –  Ashish Yadav Mar 13 '10 at 20:20
1  
Again, depends on the language. In C++, the standard behaviour is to crash the program if a destructor throws an exception during stack unwinding (see parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/exceptions.html#faq-17.3). –  Max Shawabkeh Mar 13 '10 at 20:25
    
In Java exceptions can be thrown from either the catch block or the finally block. –  johnstok Mar 13 '10 at 20:48

At the CPU level (on x86), there is a situation called a double fault:

On the x86 architecture, a double fault exception occurs if the processor encounters a problem while trying to service a pending interrupt or exception.

However, this kind of "double fault" is a very low level situation and is only of concern to the operating system kernel.

share|improve this answer
    
there are triple faults too. –  Alexandre C. Jan 7 '11 at 10:32

Few languages or frameworks can do a good job of handling an exception that occurs while cleaning up from an earlier exception. Effective handling of such situations would require the cleanup code to know what exception, if any, occurred on the "main line". Conceptually it would not be at all difficult for such information to be provided to cleanup code, but frameworks generally don't provide it.

Otherwise, normal behavior in C++ is to hard-crash the system when an exception occurs during the cleanup from another exception; Java and .NET languages generally abandon any pending exception if a cleanup exception occurs. Newer versions of Java, however, include a feature which (if used) will handles such things much better. In a try-with-resources block, an exception which occurs while cleaning up resources when no other exceptions are pending will be treated normally; if, however, an exception was pending, the pending exception will remain pending but have the new exception added to its list of "suppressed exceptions". It would be nice if there were a way of specifying that a particular finally block should behave the same way, but I don't know of any feature for that.

share|improve this answer

When Exception is occurred then complier unwind stack(closing current functions and going to back, caller function). If no exception is caught in main than complier called abort function. By this program terminate abnormally.

But during unwinding stack if another exception is occurred(for your case in destructor) than at this time/point without reaching main function, compiler called abort function which terminate program abnormally.

If you know that exception could be occurred in destructor than you must handled in destructor .Means in destructor you should have catch block to catch that exception. By this way second exception generated is to be handled within a destructor and this exception is not out from the destructor and program is to saved from crash due to two exception generated at a time

Complier handle only one exception at a time. If compiler find more than one exception call abort function by which program terminate abnormally.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.