Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The Challenge

Guidelines for code-golf on SO

The shortest code by character count to display a representation of a circle of radius R using the *character, followed by an approximation of π.

Input is a single number, R.

Since most computers seem to have almost 2:1 ratio you should only output lines where y is odd. This means that when R is odd you should print R-1 lines. There is a new testcase for R=13 to clarify.

eg.

Input
    5
Output      Correct                          Incorrect

        3    *******                    4      *******
        1   *********                   2     *********
       -1   *********                   0    ***********
       -3    *******                   -2     *********
           2.56                        -4      *******
                                            3.44

Edit: Due to widespread confusion caused by odd values of R, any solutions that pass the 4 test cases given below will be accepted

The approximation of π is given by dividing twice the number of * characters by .
The approximation should be correct to at least 6 significant digits.
Leading or trailing zeros are permitted, so for example any of 3, 3.000000, 003 is accepted for the inputs of 2 and 4.

Code count includes input/output (i.e., full program).

Test Cases

Input
    2
Output
     *** 
     *** 
    3.0

Input
    4
Output
      *****  
     ******* 
     ******* 
      *****  
    3.0

Input
    8
Output
         *******     
      *************  
     *************** 
     *************** 
     *************** 
     *************** 
      *************  
         *******     
    3.125

Input
    10
Output
          *********      
       ***************   
      *****************  
     ******************* 
     ******************* 
     ******************* 
     ******************* 
      *****************  
       ***************   
          *********      
    3.16

Bonus Test Case

Input
    13
Output

           *************       
        *******************    
       *********************   
      ***********************  
     ************************* 
     ************************* 
     ************************* 
     ************************* 
      ***********************  
       *********************   
        *******************    
           *************                                          
    2.98224852071
share|improve this question
    
You may wish to clarify whether the "input" is on the command line, or on stdin. –  Greg Hewgill Mar 13 '10 at 23:15
1  
@Greg Hewgill, Feel free to choose whichever is most convenient for the language you are using :) –  gnibbler Mar 13 '10 at 23:21
5  
I approve this code-golf. –  PiPeep Mar 14 '10 at 18:16
1  
I notice that few of the answers follow the rule of only putting out lines where y is odd. Given an odd value of r (not shown in the test cases), most will output lines where y is even! –  MtnViewMark Mar 15 '10 at 5:55
6  
Rule abuse challenge: Make code that is shorter than anyone else's code by only supporting the 4 required test cases. –  Brian Mar 16 '10 at 18:35
show 10 more comments

26 Answers 26

up vote 15 down vote accepted

In dc: 88 and 93 93 94 96 102 105 129 138 141 chars

Just in case, I am using OpenBSD and some supposedly non-portable extensions at this point.

93 chars. This is based on same formula as FORTRAN solution (slightly different results than test cases). Calculates X^2=R^2-Y^2 for every Y

[rdPr1-d0<p]sp1?dsMdd*sRd2%--
[dd*lRr-vddlMr-32rlpxRR42r2*lpxRRAP4*2+lN+sN2+dlM>y]
dsyx5klNlR/p

88 chars. Iterative solution. Matches test cases. For every X and Y checks if X^2+Y^2<=R^2

1?dsMdd*sRd2%--sY[0lM-[dd*lYd*+lRr(2*d5*32+PlN+sN1+dlM!<x]dsxxAPlY2+dsYlM>y]
dsyx5klNlR/p

To run dc pi.dc.

Here is an older annotated version:

# Routines to print '*' or ' '. If '*', increase the counter by 2
[lN2+sN42P]s1
[32P]s2
# do 1 row
# keeping I in the stack
[
 # X in the stack
 # Calculate X^2+Y^2 (leave a copy of X)
 dd*lYd*+ 
 #Calculate X^2+Y^2-R^2...
 lR-d
 # .. if <0, execute routine 1 (print '*')
 0>1
 # .. else execute routine 2 (print ' ')
 0!>2 
 # increment X..
 1+
 # and check if done with line (if not done, recurse)
 d lM!<x
]sx
# Routine to cycle for the columns
# Y is on the stack
[
  # push -X
  0lM- 

  # Do row
  lxx 
  # Print EOL
  10P
  # Increment Y and save it, leaving 2 copies
  lY 2+ dsY 
  # Check for stop condition
  lM >y
]sy
# main loop
# Push Input value
[Input:]n?
# Initialize registers
# M=rows
d sM
# Y=1-(M-(M%2))
dd2%-1r-sY
# R=M^2
d*sR
# N=0
0sN
[Output:]p
# Main routine
lyx
# Print value of PI, N/R
5klNlR/p
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't work with linux dc, but I can confirm it works on openbsd. Awesome! –  gnibbler Mar 17 '10 at 18:09
    
@Carlos, yes the ( operator sure is handy. too bad it remains unimplemented in the dc that comes with linux –  gnibbler Mar 17 '10 at 22:44
    
@gnibbler - "A complete rewrite of the dc command using the bn(3) big number routines first appeared in OpenBSD 3.5." I didn't know that. Some nice new operators are included, but they are marked as "non-portable extensions". –  Carlos Gutiérrez Mar 17 '10 at 22:45
    
Yeah, the ( operator alone allowed to shed 6 strokes! –  Dan Andreatta Mar 18 '10 at 10:25
add comment

C: 131 chars

(Based on the C++ solution by Joey)

main(i,j,c,n){for(scanf("%d",&n),c=0,i|=-n;i<n;puts(""),i+=2)for(j=-n;++j<n;putchar(i*i+j*j<n*n?c++,42:32));printf("%g",2.*c/n/n);}

(Change the i|=-n to i-=n to remove the support of odd number cases. This merely reduces char count to 130.)

As a circle:

      main(i,j,
   c,n){for(scanf(
  "%d",&n),c=0,i=1|
 -n;i<n;puts(""),i+=
 0x2)for(j=-n;++j<n;
 putchar(i*i+j*j<n*n
 ?c++,0x02a:0x020));
  printf("%g",2.*c/
   n/n);3.1415926;
      5358979;}
share|improve this answer
51  
Sweet formatting. –  Dykam Mar 14 '10 at 8:21
1  
I like how you added circles to the code to turn it into a circle. Would +000 be preferable? –  Potatoswatter Mar 14 '10 at 8:54
1  
wouldn't that only be one character...? –  Wallacoloo Mar 15 '10 at 23:57
1  
How does main() take four int arguments? –  David R Tribble Mar 16 '10 at 17:11
2  
@Load: 5.1.2.2.1/1: The function called at program startup is named main. It shall be defined … or in some other implementation-defined manner. So that's because the implementation can accept this form. –  KennyTM Mar 16 '10 at 17:55
show 10 more comments

XSLT 1.0

Just for fun, here's an XSLT version. Not really code-golf material, but it solves the problem in a weird-functional-XSLT-kind of way :)

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
                xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
                xmlns:msxsl="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:xslt" >
  <xsl:output method="html"/>

  <!-- Skip even lines -->
  <xsl:template match="s[@y mod 2=0]">
    <xsl:variable name="next">
      <!-- Just go to next line.-->
      <s R="{@R}" y="{@y+1}" x="{-@R}" area="{@area}"/>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="msxsl:node-set($next)"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- End of the line?-->
  <xsl:template match="s[@x &gt; @R]">
    <xsl:variable name="next">
      <!-- Go to next line.-->
      <s R="{@R}" y="{@y+1}" x="{-@R}" area="{@area}"/>
    </xsl:variable><!-- Print LF-->&#10;<xsl:apply-templates 
      select="msxsl:node-set($next)"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- Are we done? -->
  <xsl:template match="s[@y &gt; @R]">
    <!-- Print PI approximation -->
    <xsl:value-of select="2*@area div @R div @R"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- Everything not matched above -->
  <xsl:template match="s">
    <!-- Inside the circle?-->
    <xsl:variable name="inside" select="@x*@x+@y*@y &lt; @R*@R"/>
    <!-- Print "*" or " "-->
    <xsl:choose>
      <xsl:when test="$inside">*</xsl:when>
      <xsl:otherwise>&#160;</xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>

    <xsl:variable name="next">
      <!-- Add 1 to area if we're inside the circle. Go to next column.-->
      <s R="{@R}" y="{@y}" x="{@x+1}" area="{@area+number($inside)}"/>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="msxsl:node-set($next)"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- Begin here -->
  <xsl:template match="/R">
    <xsl:variable name="initial">
      <!-- Initial state-->
      <s R="{number()}" y="{-number()}" x="{-number()}" area="0"/>
    </xsl:variable>
    <pre>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="msxsl:node-set($initial)"/>
    </pre>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

If you want to test it, save it as pi.xslt and open the following XML file in IE:

<?xml version="1.0"?> 
<?xml-stylesheet href="pi.xslt" type="text/xsl" ?> 
<R> 
  10 
</R> 
share|improve this answer
42  
my <eyes></eyes>! The goggles, they <do>nothing</do>! –  Jimmy Mar 16 '10 at 1:52
1  
+1 crazy one. Your xmls should look fantastic –  Matias Mar 16 '10 at 1:53
1  
Dang! I'm afraid you may have beaten my HyperCard solution for uniqueness :D –  Joey Adams Mar 16 '10 at 3:44
7  
I can't believe you said "open...IE" –  harpo Mar 16 '10 at 21:18
    
Heh, yes, back in the day, we only had IE and XML with XSLT was the solution to all our problems. Good old times! :) –  Danko Durbić Mar 16 '10 at 22:17
show 1 more comment

Perl, 95 96 99 106 109 110 119 characters:

$t+=$;=1|2*sqrt($r**2-($u-2*$_)**2),say$"x($r-$;/2).'*'x$;for 0..
($u=($r=<>)-1|1);say$t*2/$r**2

(The newline can be removed and is only there to avoid a scrollbar)

Yay! Circle version!

    $t+=$;=
 1|2*sqrt($r**
2-($u-2*$_)**2)
,say$"x($r-$;/2
).'*'x$;for 0..
($u=($r=<>)-1|1
 );$pi=~say$t*
    2/$r**2

For the uninitiated, the long version:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature 'say';

# Read the radius from STDIN
my $radius = <>;

# Since we're only printing asterisks on lines where y is odd,
# the number of lines to be printed equals the size of the radius,
# or (radius + 1) if the radius is an odd number.
# Note: we're always printing an even number of lines.
my $maxline = ($radius - 1) | 1;

my $surface = 0;

# for ($_ = 0; $_ <= $maxline; $_++), if you wish
for (0 .. $maxline) {
    # First turn 0 ... N-1 into -(N/2) ... N/2 (= Y-coordinates),
    my $y = $maxline - 2*$_;

    # then use Pythagoras to see how many stars we need to print for this line.
    # Bitwise OR "casts" to int; and: 1 | int(2 * x) == 1 + 2 * int(x)
    my $stars = 1 | 2 * sqrt($radius**2-$y**2);
    $surface += $stars;    

    # $" = $LIST_SEPARATOR: default is a space,
    # Print indentation + stars 
    # (newline is printed automatically by say)
    say $" x ($radius - $stars/2) . '*' x $stars;
}

# Approximation of Pi based on surface area of circle:
say $surface*2/$radius**2;
share|improve this answer
6  
That is by far the most unreadable code I've seen in my entire life –  Chris Marisic Mar 14 '10 at 3:05
13  
I guess you've never seen APL then. –  Peter Wone Mar 14 '10 at 4:59
5  
@Chris Marisic: Did you check the other questions/topics tagged code-golf? :) I've seen far more unreadable examples. –  BalusC Mar 14 '10 at 6:51
3  
@Peter:Unlike most, I've both seen and written APL. It takes a couple weeks to get accustomed to its special characters, but after that it can be quite readable. Even after a couple of decades to get accustomed, Perl is still much worse. –  Jerry Coffin Mar 14 '10 at 7:26
1  
111 chars, $r=<>;$t+=$n=1+2*int sqrt($r**2-($u-2*$_)**2),print$"x($r-$n/2).'*'x$n.$/for(0..($u=$r-1+$r%2));print$t‌​*2/$r**2 –  Hasturkun Mar 14 '10 at 10:01
show 20 more comments

FORTRAN - 101 Chars

$ f95 piday.f95 -o piday && echo 8 | ./piday


READ*,N
DO I=-N,N,2
M=(N*N-I*I)**.5
PRINT*,(' ',J=1,N-M),('*',J=0,M*2)
T=T+2*J
ENDDO
PRINT*,T/N/N
END


    READ*,N
  K=N/2*2;DO&
 I=1-K,N,2;M=&
(N*N-I*I)**.5;;
PRINT*,(' ',J=&
1,N-M),('*',J=&
0,M*2);T=T+2*J;
 ENDDO;PRINT*&
  ,T/N/N;END;
    !PI-DAY
share|improve this answer
    
FORTRAN is competitive on this code golf! Well done. –  John Mar 17 '10 at 16:33
    
Wait, I though formatting was important in Fortran? You have letters in column 1! –  Joel Mar 18 '10 at 16:22
    
@Joel, Fortran95 allows free-form code –  gnibbler Mar 18 '10 at 21:08
    
Most people are still stuck on Fortan77 from what I've seen. –  Joel Mar 22 '10 at 16:49
8  
I like how the circle version looks like the Death Star. –  mskfisher Nov 5 '10 at 19:35
show 2 more comments

x86 Machine Code: 127 bytes

Intel Assembler: 490 chars

    mov si,80h
    mov cl,[si]
    jcxz ret
    mov bx,10
    xor ax,ax
    xor bp,bp
    dec cx
  a:mul bx
    mov dl,[si+2]
    sub dl,48
    cmp dl,bl
    jae ret
    add ax,dx
    inc si
    loop a
    mov dl,al
    inc dl
    mov dh,al
    add dh,dh
    mov ch,dh
    mul al
    mov di,ax
  x:mov al,ch
    sub al,dl
    imul al
    mov si,ax
    mov cl,dh
  c:mov al,cl
    sub al,dl
    imul al
    add ax,si
    cmp ax,di
    mov al,32
    ja y
    or al,bl
    add bp,2
  y:int 29h
    dec cl
    jnz c
    mov al,bl
    int 29h
    mov al,13
    int 29h
    sub ch,2
    jnc x
    mov ax,bp
    cwd
    mov cl,7
  e:div di
    cmp cl,6
    jne z
    pusha
    mov al,46
    int 29h
    popa
  z:add al,48
    int 29h
    mov ax,bx
    mul dx
    jz ret
    dec cl
    jnz e
    ret

This version handles the bonus test case as well and is 133 bytes:

    mov si,80h
    mov cl,[si]
    jcxz ret
    mov bx,10
    xor ax,ax
    xor bp,bp
    dec cx
  a:mul bx
    mov dl,[si+2]
    sub dl,48
    cmp dl,bl
    jae ret
    add ax,dx
    inc si
    loop a
    mov dl,al
    rcr dl,1
    adc dl,dh
    add dl,dl
    mov dh,dl
    add dh,dh
    dec dh
    mov ch,dh
    mul al
    mov di,ax
  x:mov al,ch
    sub al,dl
    imul al
    mov si,ax
    mov cl,dh
  c:mov al,cl
    sub al,dl
    imul al
    add ax,si
    cmp ax,di
    mov al,32
    jae y
    or al,bl
    add bp,2
  y:int 29h
    dec cl
    jnz c
    mov al,bl
    int 29h
    mov al,13
    int 29h
    sub ch,2
    jnc x
    mov ax,bp
    cwd
    mov cl,7
  e:div di
    cmp cl,6
    jne z
    pusha
    mov al,46
    int 29h
    popa
  z:add al,48
    int 29h
    mov ax,bx
    mul dx
    jz ret
    dec cl
    jnz e
    ret
share|improve this answer
12  
I love StackOverflow! –  zengr Mar 16 '10 at 8:25
2  
It's interesting that some of the high level languages have shorter character counts than the binary this produces. –  Colin Valliant Mar 17 '10 at 0:13
3  
@Alcari: If you included all the code in the libraries the higher level languages use, their character counts would be significantly higher. In assembler, doing printf("%f",a/b) is not trivial, there's no single instruction to do that, and my implementation above assumes that 0 <= a/b < 10 and that the operation is a division and that a and b are integers. –  Skizz Mar 17 '10 at 9:10
add comment

Python: 101 104 107 110 chars

Based on the other Python version by Nicholas Riley.

r=input()
t=0
i=1
exec"n=1+int((2*i*r-i*i)**.5)*2;t+=2.*n/r/r;print' '*(r-n/2)+'*'*n;i+=2;"*r
print t

Credits to AlcariTheMad for some of the math.


Ah, the odd-numbered ones are indexed with zero as the middle, explains everything.

Bonus Python: 115 chars (quickly hacked together)

r=input()
t=0
i=1
while i<r*2:n=1+int((2*i*r-i*i)**.5)*2;t+=2.*n/r/r;print' '*(r-n/2)+'*'*n;i+=2+(r-i==2)*2
print t
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, yeah, '+' beats -1 and , any day. Yet another technique I put out of my mind because it's almost never the right thing to do :-) –  Nicholas Riley Mar 14 '10 at 22:10
    
I've used C in the past, and never even looked at Python. This 104 chars is more readable than the C++ above. Amazing. Maybe I should learn Python... –  Dean Rather Mar 15 '10 at 3:18
    
@Dean: One of the main goals of Python is to be easy to read and write. –  Colin Valliant Mar 15 '10 at 3:31
    
have you though about using exec with your 104 char answer too? :) –  gnibbler Mar 19 '10 at 5:18
    
I would need to roll my own compression - zlib, marshalling, etc all came out larger than the actual code. –  lunixbochs Mar 19 '10 at 20:08
show 3 more comments

Powershell, 119 113 109 characters

($z=-($n=$args[($s=0)])..$n)|?{$_%2}|%{$l="";$i=$_
$z|%{$l+=" *"[$i*$i+$_*$_-lt$n*$n-and++$s]};$l};2*$s/$n/$n

and here's a prettier version:

( $range = -( $R = $args[ ( $area = 0 ) ] ) .. $R ) | 
  where { $_ % 2 } |
  foreach {
    $line = ""
    $i = $_
    $range | foreach {
        $line += " *"[ $i*$i + $_*$_ -lt $R*$R -and ++$area ]
    }
    $line
 }
 2 * $area / $R / $R
share|improve this answer
    
Is all Powershell code this ugly? ;) –  Thor Hovden Mar 14 '10 at 18:02
    
@Thor: I hope not, but this must be the ugliest thing I've ever written :) –  Danko Durbić Mar 14 '10 at 22:40
3  
Thanks for that prettier version =) –  Thor Hovden Mar 15 '10 at 9:37
    
@Thor: You're welcome! –  Danko Durbić Mar 15 '10 at 23:49
add comment

C#: 209 202 201 characters:

using C=System.Console;class P{static void Main(string[]a){int r=int.Parse(a[0]),s=0,i,x,y;for(y=1-r;y<r;y+=2){for(x=1-r;x<r;s+=i)C.Write(" *"[i=x*x+++y*y<=r*r?1:0]);C.WriteLine();}C.Write(s*2d/r/r);}}

Unminified:

using C = System.Console;
class P {
  static void Main(string[] arg) {
    int r = int.Parse(arg[0]), sum = 0, inside, x, y;
    for (y = 1 - r; y < r; y += 2) {
      for (x = 1 - r; x < r; sum += inside)
        C.Write(" *"[inside = x * x++ + y * y <= r * r ? 1 : 0]);
      C.WriteLine();
    }
    C.Write(sum * 2d / r / r);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice trick, char[]. –  Dykam Mar 14 '10 at 8:23
    
I don't know C# very much but shouldn't you able to use string[]a and 1-r (instead of -1+r)? –  KennyTM Mar 14 '10 at 10:02
    
@Kenny: You are right. :) That saves three characters, and then I managed to get rid of five more. –  Guffa Mar 14 '10 at 10:40
    
Spotted that first thing, totally missed on the -r+1 thingy. –  Dykam Mar 14 '10 at 11:24
4  
Also, spotted x*xx+++y*y too, but it is a mad thing to dissect at first glance. –  Dykam Mar 14 '10 at 11:36
show 3 more comments

HyperTalk: 237 characters

Indentation is not required nor counted. It is added for clarity. Also note that HyperCard 2.2 does accept those non-ASCII relational operators I used.

function P R
  put""into t
  put 0into c
  repeat with i=-R to R
    if i mod 2≠0then
      repeat with j=-R to R
        if i^2+j^2≤R^2then
          put"*"after t
          add 1to c
        else
          put" "after t
        end if
      end repeat
      put return after t
    end if
  end repeat
  return t&2*c/R/R
end P

Since HyperCard 2.2 doesn't support stdin/stdout, a function is provided instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hypercard, Mr. Adams? Seriously? This is highly unexpected. –  Kawa Mar 14 '10 at 11:10
1  
@Kawa: That's kind of why I posted it :) Also, code golf is a good way to build up a test suite in case I decide to write a HyperTalk interpreter in the future. –  Joey Adams Mar 14 '10 at 18:59
    
Hah! I'd like to see that, XD –  Kawa Mar 15 '10 at 17:14
    
If you ever decide to write that interpreter, or want to join work on an existing one, let me know and I can add mention of it on hypercard.org and I'd be curious about how it goes :-) –  uliwitness Oct 27 '13 at 13:07
add comment

Haskell 139 145 147 150 230 chars:

x True=' ';x _='*'
a n=unlines[[x$i^2+j^2>n^2|j<-[-n..n]]|i<-[1-n,3-n..n]]
b n=a n++show(sum[2|i<-a n,i=='*']/n/n)
main=readLn>>=putStrLn.b

Handling the odd numbers: 148 chars:

main=do{n<-readLn;let{z k|k<n^2='*';z _=' ';c=[[z$i^2+j^2|j<-[-n..n]]|i<-[1,3..n]];d=unlines$reverse c++c};putStrLn$d++show(sum[2|i<-d,i=='*']/n/n)}

150 chars: (Based on the C version.)

a n=unlines[concat[if i^2+j^2>n^2then" "else"*"|j<-[-n..n]]|i<-[1-n,3-n..n]]
main=do n<-read`fmap`getLine;putStr$a n;print$2*sum[1|i<-a n,i=='*']/n/n

230 chars:

main=do{r<-read`fmap`getLine;let{p=putStr;d=2/fromIntegral r^2;l y n=let c m x=if x>r then p"\n">>return m else if x*x+y*y<r*r then p"*">>c(m+d)(x+1)else p" ">>c m(x+1)in if y>r then print n else c n(-r)>>=l(y+2)};l(1-r`mod`2-r)0}

Unminified:

main = do r <- read `fmap` getLine
          let p = putStr
              d = 2/fromIntegral r^2
              l y n = let c m x = if x > r
                                  then p "\n" >> return m
                                  else if x*x+y*y<r*r
                                       then p "*" >> c (m+d) (x+1)
                                       else p " " >> c m (x+1)
                      in if y > r
                         then print n
                         else c n (-r) >>= l (y+2)
          l (1-r`mod`2-r) 0

I was kinda hoping it would beat some of the imperative versions, but I can't seem to compress it any further at this point.

share|improve this answer
    
Chopped off 2 more by getting rid of the "d" and adding 1 instead of it and then printing "2*n/fromIntegral r^2" –  Steve Mar 14 '10 at 8:27
    
Shaved 3 characters off via a few Haskell tricks. I love that in Haskell there is often no cost to multiple lines (newline vs. semicolon) and hence our code-golf is generally readable! –  MtnViewMark Mar 14 '10 at 16:26
    
Strictly speaking, the 145-char version only works if the input is even. But very nice either way. –  Steve Mar 16 '10 at 7:31
    
Shortened the I/O line. It should still be possible to save a few more characters by pushing the function defs into a main=do{...let{...}...} block, I think. –  comingstorm Mar 16 '10 at 8:18
    
@comingstorm: Cool! I didn't know about readLn. This will help many a Haskell code-golf. @Steve: Yup, I'm still trying to figure out the most efficient way to fix that. –  MtnViewMark Mar 16 '10 at 14:19
show 2 more comments

Ruby, 96 chars

(based on Guffa's C# solution):

r=gets.to_f
s=2*t=r*r
g=1-r..r
g.step(2){|y|g.step{|x|putc' * '[i=t<=>x*x+y*y];s+=i}
puts}
p s/t

109 chars (bonus):

r=gets.to_i
g=-r..r
s=g.map{|i|(g.map{|j|i*i+j*j<r*r ?'*':' '}*''+"\n")*(i%2)}*''
puts s,2.0/r/r*s.count('*')
share|improve this answer
    
(1..2*r=gets.to_f) for reading from stdin –  gnibbler Mar 14 '10 at 22:12
    
Thanks! I'm embarrassed to see how unreadable Ruby can be... :) –  Mladen Jablanović Mar 14 '10 at 22:49
    
you can also use p s instead of puts s :) –  gnibbler Mar 14 '10 at 23:07
    
cool, thanks! ;) –  Mladen Jablanović Mar 15 '10 at 16:01
1  
Nice fresh ideas in there - I like that you are using g with 2 different step sizes and the <=> to avoid having code to convert from logical –  gnibbler Mar 20 '10 at 22:42
add comment

PHP: 117

Based on dev-null-dweller

for($y=1-$r=$argv[1];$y<$r;$y+=2,print"\n")for($x=1-$r;$x<$r;$x++)echo$r*$r>$x*$x+$y*$y&&$s++?'*':' ';echo$s*2/$r/$r;
share|improve this answer
add comment

You guys are thinking way too hard.

switch (r) {
   case 1,2:
      echo "*"; break;
   case 3,4:
      echo " ***\n*****\n ***"; break;
   // etc.
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Character count gets a bit out of hand, don't you think? :) –  gnibbler Mar 15 '10 at 23:53
7  
Doesn't scale. Unmaintainable! –  spoulson Mar 16 '10 at 18:42
    
I tried compressing the test case cheat as much as possible and it still ended up slightly larger than my actual solution :P –  lunixbochs Mar 16 '10 at 20:45
5  
+1, always do the most obvious thing first... if someone doesnt like it, loudly complain that the spec wasnt clear enough –  mizipzor Mar 19 '10 at 14:23
    
Brian had a semi-serious attempt at special casing the test cases, you should upvote his too if you like this answer ;) stackoverflow.com/questions/2457995 –  gnibbler Mar 21 '10 at 22:21
add comment

J: 47, 46, 45

Same basic idea as other solutions, i.e. r^2 <= x^2 + y^2, but J's array-oriented notation simplifies the expression:

c=:({&' *',&":2*+/@,%#*#)@:>_2{.\|@j./~@i:@<:

You'd call it like c 2 or c 8 or c 10 etc.

Bonus: 49

To handle odd input, e.g. 13, we have to filter on odd-valued x coordinates, rather than simply taking every other row of output (because now the indices could start at either an even or odd number). This generalization costs us 4 characters:

c=:*:({&' *'@],&":2%(%+/@,))]>(|@j./~2&|#])@i:@<:

Deminimized version:

c =: verb define
  pythag   =. y > | j./~ i:y-1    NB.  r^2 > x^2 + y^2
  squished =. _2 {.\ pythag       NB.  Odd rows only
  piApx    =. (2 * +/ , squished) %  y*y
  (squished { ' *') , ": piApx
)

Improvements and generalizations due to Marshall Lochbam on the J Forums.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Python: 118 characters

Pretty much a straightforward port of the Perl version.

r=input()
u=r+r%2
t=0
for i in range(u):n=1+2*int((r*r-(u-1-2*i)**2)**.5);t+=n;print' '*(r-n/2-1),'*'*n
print 2.*t/r/r
share|improve this answer
    
For python2 you can just use r=input() –  gnibbler Mar 14 '10 at 8:11
    
You don't need the space between print and ' ' –  gnibbler Mar 14 '10 at 8:13
    
OK, that's scary, it's shorter than the Perl version now. (I completely put "input" out of my mind because it's so unsafe ordinarily...) –  Nicholas Riley Mar 14 '10 at 8:37
    
Not anymore :-P –  mercator Mar 14 '10 at 16:48
add comment

C++: 169 characters

#include <iostream>
int main(){int i,j,c=0,n;std::cin>>n;for(i=-n;i<=n;i+=2,std::cout<<'\n')for(j=-n;j<=n;j++)std::cout<<(i*i+j*j<=n*n?c++,'*':' ');std::cout<<2.*c/n/n;}

Unminified:

#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    int i,j,c=0,n;
    std::cin>>n;
    for(i=-n;i<=n;i+=2,std::cout<<'\n')
        for(j=-n;j<=n;j++)
            std::cout<<(i*i+j*j<=n*n?c++,'*':' ');
    std::cout<<2.*c/n/n;
}

(Yes, using std:: instead of using namespace std uses less characters)

The output here doesn't match the test cases in the original post, so here's one that does (written for readability). Consider it a reference implementation (if Poita_ doesn't mind):

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    int i, j, c=0, n;
    cin >> n;
    for(i=-n; i<=n; i++) {
        if (i & 1) {
            for(j=-n; j<=n; j++) {
                if (i*i + j*j <= n*n) {
                    cout << '*';
                    c++;
                } else {
                    cout << ' ';
                }
            }
            cout << '\n';
        }
    }
    cout << 2.0 * c / n / n << '\n';
}

C++: 168 characters (with output I believe is correct)

#include <iostream>
int main(){int i,j,c=0,n;std::cin>>n;for(i=-n|1;i<=n;i+=2,std::cout<<"\n")for(j=-n;j<=n;j++)std::cout<<" *"[i*i+j*j<=n*n&&++c];std::cout<<2.*c/n/n;}
share|improve this answer
    
The code loops from -n to n, so for an input of for example 4 it displays a diameter of 9, not 7 as shown in the test cases. –  Guffa Mar 13 '10 at 23:48
    
Is it a requirement that your circle matches the OP's exactly? –  Peter Alexander Mar 14 '10 at 0:03
3  
You may wish to change it to #include <iostream.h> which basically is #include <iostream> -- using namespace std; for compatibility with old C++ compilers. –  Earlz Mar 14 '10 at 5:18
1  
@Carlos, I didn't write that particular bit, but it's a binary AND operator. It checks that the last bit is set, which is equivalent to doing i%2, but is "faster". It's not really faster because the compiler would do it anyway. –  Peter Alexander Mar 14 '10 at 19:54
1  
@Poita_: Actually, i%2 and i&1 behave differently with negative numbers. (-1)&1 is 1, which is what we want here. (-1)%2 is -1 on my system, and this conforms to C99. Thus, although if (i&1) and if (i%2) will do the same thing, one must be careful with if (i%2 == 1), which won't work when i is negative. –  Joey Adams Mar 14 '10 at 22:45
show 9 more comments

PHP: 126 132 138

(based on Guffa C# solution)

126:

for($y=1-($r=$argv[1]);$y<$r;$y+=2,print"\n")for($x=1-$r;$x<$r;$s+=$i,++$x)echo($i=$x*$x+$y*$y<=$r*$r)?'*':' ';echo$s*2/$r/$r;

132:

for($y=1-($r=$argv[1]);$y<$r;$y+=2){for($x=1-$r;$x<$r;@$s+=$i,++$x)echo($i=$x*$x+$y*$y<=$r*$r?1:0)?'*':' ';echo"\n";}echo$s*2/$r/$r;

138:

for($y=1-($r=$argv[1]);$y<$r;$y+=2){for($x=1-$r;$x<$r;@$s+=$i){$t=$x;echo($i=$t*$x++ +$y*$y<=$r*$r?1:0)?'*':' ';}echo"\n";}echo$s*2/$r/$r;

Current full:

for( $y = 1 - ( $r = $argv[1]); $y < $r; $y += 2, print "\n")
    for( $x = 1-$r; $x < $r; $s += $i, ++$x)
        echo( $i = $x*$x + $y*$y <= $r*$r) ? '*' : ' ';
echo $s*2 /$r /$r;

Can be without @ before first $s but only with error_reporting set to 0 (Notice outputs is messing the circle)

share|improve this answer
    
what does the /$r do in echo $s*2 /$r /$r; –  davidosomething Mar 15 '10 at 23:45
    
$s*2/$r/$r = $s*2/($r*$r) –  Jasper Bekkers Mar 15 '10 at 23:59
    
OHH division... the spacing threw me off, thought it was some operator shorthand i'd never seen –  davidosomething Mar 16 '10 at 0:06
add comment

Ruby 1.8.x, 93

r=$_.to_f
q=0
e=r-1
(p(('*'*(n=1|2*(r*r-e*e)**0.5)).center r+r)
q+=n+n
e-=2)while-r<e
p q/r/r

Run with $ ruby -p piday

share|improve this answer
    
Nice one, but it doesn't print out the pi approximation –  gnibbler Mar 21 '10 at 22:14
    
Fixed now. Just saw the code-golf today. –  DigitalRoss Mar 21 '10 at 23:15
    
It doesn't work in 1.9.1, and prints double quotes around the circle. –  Mladen Jablanović Mar 22 '10 at 18:30
    
It's normal for golf programs not to work on a wildly different language levels. How many Perl or Python c-g's work on every version of the language? It is interesting, though, turns out the reason is because Integer|Float no longer coerces the float on 1.9. –  DigitalRoss Mar 23 '10 at 13:55
add comment

APL: 59

This function accepts a number and returns the two expected items. Works correctly in bonus cases.

{⍪(⊂' *'[1+m]),q÷⍨2×+/,m←(2|v)⌿(q←⍵*2)>v∘.+v←2*⍨⍵-⍳1+2×⍵-1}

Dialect is Dyalog APL, with default index origin. Skill level is clueless newbie, so if any APL guru wants to bring it down to 10 characters, be my guest!


You can try it online on Try APL, just paste it in and put a number after it:

   {⍪(⊂' *'[1+m]),q÷⍨2×+/,m←(2|v)⌿(q←⍵*2)>v∘.+v←2*⍨⍵-⍳1+2×⍵-1} 13
      *************
   *******************
  *********************
 ***********************
*************************
*************************
*************************
*************************
 ***********************
  *********************
   *******************
      *************
2.98225
share|improve this answer
    
Although I dont know APL, It looks prettier than the J version. –  ahala Jul 25 '13 at 1:10
    
@ahala Indeed. APL is beautiful, both conceptually and aesthetically. I started learning J, but was turned off by the random ASCII craziness. A good soul wrote an open source APL interpreter for Node.js (npm install apl) that's pretty good. It computes the above code with just a minor change (no monadic , 2nd char.) You can find good APL documentation on all vendor sites, such as Dyalog. –  Tobia Jul 25 '13 at 1:20
add comment

And a bash entry: 181 186 190 chars

for((y=-(r=$1,r/2*2);y<=r;y+=2));do for((x=-r;x<=r;++x));do((x*x+y*y<r*r))&&{((++n));echo -n '*';}||echo -n " ";((x<r))||echo;done;done;((s=1000,p=n*2*s/r/r,a=p/s,b=p%s));echo $a.$b

Run with e.g. bash py.sh 13

share|improve this answer
add comment

Python: 148 characters.

Failed (i.e. not short enough) attempt to abuse the rules and hardcode the test cases, as I mentioned in reply to the original post. Abusing it with a more verbose language may have been easier:

a=3.0,3.125,3.16
b="1","23","3677","47899"
r=input()
for i in b[r/3]+b[r/3][::-1]:q=1+2*int(i);print ' '*(int(b[r/3][-1])-int(i))+'*'*q
print a[r/5]
share|improve this answer
add comment

bc: 165, 127, 126 chars

Based on the Python version.

r=read()
for(i=-1;r*2>i+=2;scale=6){n=sqrt(2*i*r-i*i)
scale=0
n=1+n/1*2
j=r-n/2
t+=2*n
while(j--)" "
while(n--)"*"
"
"}
t/r/r

(New line after the last line cannot be omitted here.)

share|improve this answer
1  
127 chars: r=read();for(i=1;i<r*2;scale=6){n=sqrt(2*i*r-i*i);scale=0;n=1+n/1*2;i+=2;j=r-n/2‌​;t+=2*n;while(j--)" ";while(n--)"*";" "};t/r/r –  Carlos Gutiérrez Mar 17 '10 at 4:26
    
@Carlos Gutiérrez: Nice shortening, thanks! –  przemoc Mar 17 '10 at 12:33
    
The only problem here is that it now fails for 0, but according to current rules, it's ok. –  przemoc Mar 17 '10 at 12:45
add comment

JavaScript (SpiderMonkey) - 118 chars

This version accepts input from stdin and passes the bonus test cases

r=readline()
for(t=0,i=-r;i<r;i++)if(i%2){for(s='',j=-r;j<r;j++){t+=q=i*i+j*j<r*r
s+=q?'*':' '}print(s)}print(t*2/r/r)

Usage: cat 10 | js thisfile.js -- jsbin preview adds an alias for print/readline so you can view in browser

Javascript: 213 163


Updated

r=10;m=Math;a=Array;t=0;l=document;for(i=-r;i<r;i+=2){w=m.floor(m.sqrt(r*r-i*i)*2);t+=w*2;l.writeln(a(m.round(r-w/2)).join(' ')+a(w).join('*'));}l.writeln(t/(r*r))

Nobody said it had to render correctly in the browser - just the output. As such I've removed the pre tags and optimised it further. To view the output you need to view generated source or set your stylesheet accordingly. Pi is less accurate this way, but it's now to spec.


r=10;m=Math;a=Array;t=0;s='';for(i=-r;i<r;i++){w=m.floor((m.sqrt(m.pow(r,2)-m.pow(i,2)))*2);t+=w;if(i%2){z=a(m.round(r-w/2)).join(' ')+a(w).join('*');s+=z+'\n';}}document.write('<pre>'+(s+(t/m.pow(r,2)))+'</pre>')

Unminified:

r=10;
m=Math;
a=Array;
t=0;
s='';
for(i=-r;i<r;i++){
    w=m.floor((m.sqrt(m.pow(r,2)-m.pow(i,2)))*2);
    t+=w;
    if(i%2){
    z=a(m.round(r-w/2)).join(' ')+a(w).join('*');
    s+=z+'\n';
    }
}
document.write('<pre>'+(s+(t/m.pow(r,2)))+'</pre>');
share|improve this answer
add comment

Java: 234

class C{public static void main(String[] a){int x,y,s=0,r=Integer.parseInt(a[0]);for(y=1-r;y<r;y+=2){for(x=1-r;x<r;++x){boolean b=x*x+y*y<=r*r;s+=b?1:0;System.out.print(b?'*':' ');}System.out.println();}System.out.println(s*2d/r/r);}}

Unminified:

class C{
    public static void main(String[] a){
        int x,y,s=0,r=Integer.parseInt(a[0]); 
        for(y=1-r;y<r;y+=2){
            for(x=1-r;x<r;++x) {
                boolean b=x*x+y*y<=r*r;
                s+=b?1:0;
                System.out.print(b?'*':' ');
            }
            System.out.println();
        }
        System.out.println(s*2d/r/r);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could probably save ~50 characters rewriting this in scala –  rwyland Apr 16 '12 at 5:01
add comment

GAWK: 136, 132, 126, 125 chars

Based on the Python version.

{r=$1
for(i=-1;r*2>i+=2;print""){n=1+int((2*i*r-i*i)**.5)*2
t+=2*n/r/r
printf"%*s",r-n/2,""
while(n--)printf"%c","*"}print t}
share|improve this answer
    
Only the first result is correct now. –  przemoc Mar 17 '10 at 13:35
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.