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In a large loop I change several values and need them to be updatet. I dont want to use a BackGroundWorker.

Is there a cheaper way to make the updates, something like to tell the application to paint all pending changes?

void ExampleFunc()
{
    // The original function is more complex
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        MyControl1.Text = NewText1(i);
        MyControl2.Text = OtherNewText(i);

        MyControl1.Update();
        MyControl1.Update();
    }
}

EDIT: Why I do need to do it this way: I usually use BackGroundWorker for situations like that, but in this case on some PCs I get problems with the invokes. So I can't use use it in this case

share|improve this question
    
Why are you updating 10000 times anyway? It's not like the user is going to be able to see that happening. Update is a way to run all pending changes and you make one change on each iteration of the loop. – usr Jun 25 '14 at 10:17
1  
Also, note that the standard solution is to perform work on a separate thread so that the UI can paint itself whenever that is necessary. – usr Jun 25 '14 at 10:18
    
10000 is just an example. Its a long running loop and the user needs the feedback whats happening. Yes, I usually use BackGroundWorker for situations like that, but in this case on some PCs I get problems with the invokes. So I can't use use it in this case. – boboes Jun 25 '14 at 10:27
    
Sounds like you should rather fix the bug that you have with backgroundworker. Anyway, did you understand my remarks in the first comment? You are generating tons of changes which is why it's taking a long time. Generate less changes. – usr Jun 25 '14 at 10:38
1  
Then you're out of luck. Repainting is expensive. What about painting every 10th iteration or only if 100ms have passed? – usr Jun 25 '14 at 10:49
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You say that you cannot use a separate thread and that you must repaint often enough to give the user feedback.

Repainting is expensive. Paint every 10th iteration or every 100ms to reduce the overhead.

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