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I have been looking at an old colleges SQL and have stumbled upon some syntax which i have not used before and have no understanding of..

SELECT * FROM TABLE1
LEFT JOIN TABLE 2 ON (TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE1.COLUMN2), TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN1 LIKE '%%'
AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1;

I am fine with this part of the statement,

SELECT * FROM TABLE1
LEFT JOIN TABLE 2 ON (TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE1.COLUMN2)

But struggle with the second part of the join,

, TABLE3 WHERE COLUMN1 LIKE '%%'
AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1;

Would anyone be able to shine some light on the foreign concept?

My initial guess was the comma is a way of listing tables to join rather than typing out LEFT JOIN for each table you want to join but i am now unsure.

Cheers.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The comma is old-style join syntax that has been obsolete (but fully supported) for decades. Almost everyone prefers explicit join syntax nowadays.

The comma is functionally equivalent to a cross join -- a full cartesian product. So the query is the same as:

SELECT *
FROM TABLE1 LEFT JOIN
     TABLE 2
     ON TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE1.COLUMN2 CROSS JOIN
     TABLE3
WHERE COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1;

I wouldn't write a query like this. First, COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' would generate an error because TABLE1 and TABLE3 have a column with that name. And, there is no join condition on TABLE2. Let me assume these are typos, and you mean:

SELECT *
FROM TABLE1 LEFT JOIN
     TABLE2
     ON TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE2.COLUMN2 CROSS JOIN
     TABLE3
WHERE TABLE1.COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1;

The comparison TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1 turns the LEFT JOIN into an INNER JOIN, because NULL values will cause that comparison to fail. There is no outer join on TABLE3. So the query should be equivalent to:

SELECT *
FROM TABLE1 LEFT JOIN
     TABLE2
     ON TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE2.COLUMN2 JOIN
     TABLE3
     ON TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1
WHERE COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' ;
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You are correct, it was a typo! Many thanks for the explanation. I was under the impression that it was legacy syntax as it has been in place since roughly 2000. –  FVCKYETI Jun 25 '14 at 14:38
  • Instead of the comma you can type "INNER JOIN" or just "JOIN"
  • You don't have to type COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' it doesn't filter anything
  • This is a strange query, left join won't work as you expect, because you join TABLE2 with TABLE3 later (AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1). If you expect left join behavior you have to put this line in the clause ON in left join

In accordance with the comments below you can rewrite this query like this:

SELECT * 
  FROM TABLE1
 INNER JOIN TABLE3
  LEFT JOIN TABLE2 ON (TABLE1.COLUMN1 = TABLE1.COLUMN2 AND TABLE2.COLUMN1 = TABLE3.COLUMN1)
 WHERE COLUMN1 LIKE '%%' -- you can remove this line, the resultset will be the same
;
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