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I want to build some CSS along these lines:

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {some rule}
h1 a,h2 a,h3 a,h4 a,h5 a,h6 a {color: inherit;}
h1 span,h2 span,h3 span,h4 span,h5 span,h6 span {another rule;}

It would be useful if I could create a variable like this:

@headings: h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6;

and then maybe do something like this:

@{headings} {
  & a {color: inherit;}
}

Unfortunately this gives me:

h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 a {
  color: inherit;
}

Is what I want possible? This is a simple version of what I want to do but I would also find useful for working with HTML input types and other instances of multiple selectors that often appear together.

share|improve this question
    
See stackoverflow.com/a/23954580/2712740 solution #3. –  seven-phases-max Jun 25 at 12:31
    
possible duplicate of Build list of selectors with LESS –  Huangism Jun 25 at 12:58
    
Thanks, unfortunately that appears to be the inverse of my problem and gives me h1 a , h1 span {rule} instead of h1 a,h2 a,h3 a,h4 a,h5 a,h6 a {rule} h1 span,h2 a,h3 a,h4 a,h5 a,h6 a {another rule;} –  Rachel Reveley Jun 25 at 13:18
    
Well, it's actually exactly the same code that can give you what you need (it may just look too cryptic to understand how to use it correctly though). Also speaking of h1 span, h2 a, h3 a ... - I assume it's a typo since there'no way @{headings} {...} can give such output (even if it would work that way).. I.e. for h1 span, h2 a, h3 a ... you have to have h1 and h2, h3, ... separated. –  seven-phases-max Jun 25 at 19:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

#1 Just yet one more solution in addition to @helderdarocha's answer and those given in http://stackoverflow.com/a/23954580/2712740. Maybe be this one could look a bit more clear:

// define header list as usual just
// put a mixin call with some predefined name there
h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {.headings}

// now to add styles/childs to the header list just add the mixin definitions:

.headings() {
    some: rule;
}

.headings() {
  a {color: inherit}
}

.headings() {
  span {another: rule}
}

// etc.

The limitation of this solution is that h1, h2, h3 ... {} and .headings should be defined at the same level. Additionally, it's important to keep in mind that all these styles will output to CSS at the point of h1, h2, h3 ... {} definition not at the point of .headings definitions, so it may break your cascading overrides if you have some).


#2 The alt. solution I'm copy-pasting from http://stackoverflow.com/a/23954580/2712740 #3, basicaly it's the same as #1 but w/o its limitations (just having more special scary symbols):

// the "variable":
.headings(@-) {
    h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6
        {@-();}}


// usage:

.headings({
    some: rule;
});

.headings({
    a {color: inherit}
});

.headings({
    span {another: rule}
});

//etc.
share|improve this answer
1  
Just in case I'm yet again assuming h1 span,h2 a,h3 a,h4 a,h5 a,h6 a {another rule;} is a typo (having it that way and than hardcoding if (h1) {...} else {...} for the @headings looks like a bloody overengineering if compared to plain CSS h1 span {...}; h2, h3, ... {...}. –  seven-phases-max Jun 25 at 19:15
    
You are correct it was a failure to copy and paste the span across to the other bits. I am wanting to use a simple method that I can use in a few places, this was a simple example but I think it will be useful in my forms code where I currently have to specify different input types like password and number in multiple places. I'll have a look at the solutions in the morning when my brain is a little more awake. –  Rachel Reveley Jun 26 at 13:36
    
Thanks for the answers everyone. Seven-phases-max's first answer is the way I'll go. I'm a CSSer rather than a javascripter so this is much simpler for me to understand and the code needs to be passable to god knows whom in a few months and they may also not understand what is going on with more complicated stuff. –  Rachel Reveley Jun 27 at 8:01

Use a Ruleset

If you define your heading group as a ruleset with a mixin call to set properties with, then you can do this:

@headings: {h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {.setProps()}};


& {
    .setProps() {
        & {
            some: rule;
        }
        a {
            color: inherit;
        }
        span {
            another: rule;
        }
    }
    @headings();
}

I've isolated the whole thing inside & just so the .setProps() can be localized (it would work without it, but it would be setting the .setProps() globally. Also, the nested & {} bracketing is not necessary, but I find that it helps show what the "default" for the @headings is going to be.

This can be used sequentially, if desired, like so:

& {
    .setProps() {  some: rule; }
    @headings();
}
& {
    .setProps() { a {color: inherit;}}
    @headings();
}
& {
    .setProps() { span {another: rule;}}
    @headings();
}

Both will output like so:

h1,
h2,
h3,
h4,
h5,
h6 {
  some: rule;
}
h1 a,
h2 a,
h3 a,
h4 a,
h5 a,
h6 a {
  color: inherit;
}
h1 span,
h2 span,
h3 span,
h4 span,
h5 span,
h6 span {
  another: rule;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to spoil it but it seems that this way it's even more complicated then just with pure detached-rulesets (i.e. as in stackoverflow.com/a/23954580/2712740 solution #3). Normally you don't need "callback mixins" if you already decide to use detached-rulesets (just because the detached-ruleset can serve as callback itself) OK, I'll update my answer to not link to the old one again and again. –  seven-phases-max Jun 26 at 14:57
3  
@seven-phases-max: Not really a spoiler, as I agree that your #3 in that solution is better (and less "complicated," though perhaps not as intuitively "obvious" what is happening). I offered this here only because it is yet a different way of going about it. I tend to like to give as many options as possible and let users decide what they deem best for their situations. –  ScottS Jun 26 at 15:08

If you have these variables and selectors:

@headings: h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6;

@{headings} {
    some-rule: rule;    
}
.headings { // this is a placeholder
    color: inherit;
}
h1 span {
    other-rule: rule;
}

You can use this mixin to generate the code you want:

.mixin(@headings; @count) when (@count > 0) {
    .mixin(@headings; @count - 1);
    @heading: extract(@headings, @count);
    @{heading}{
        & a:extend(.headings) {}
        & a:extend(h1 span) when not (@heading = h1) {}
    }
}

Calling:

.mixin(@headings, length(@headings));

will generate:

h1, h2, h3, h4, h5, h6 {
  some-rule: rule;
}
.headings,
h1 a,
h2 a,
h3 a,
h4 a,
h5 a,
h6 a {
  color: inherit;
}
h1 span,
h2 a,
h3 a,
h4 a,
h5 a,
h6 a {
  other-rule: rule;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What absolutely baffles me is that h1 .. h6 { a {} } generates h1 a .. h6 a as one would expect, but @headings: h1 .. h6; @{headings} { a {} } does something entirely different. I wonder if it's just one of those mysterious quirks of LESS variable interpolation. –  BoltClock Jun 25 at 16:39
    
It's just because an interpolated variable always interpreted as a single selector element and this is because there's no way to know if it's not w/o reparsing variable's value from scratch at this point. The Less is one-pass compiler by design so each special case when you need to reparse something is the pain in the ass (requires a bunch of new code) (Historically it's a back-side of the lazy-loading). –  seven-phases-max Jun 25 at 18:41

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