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I wish to implement a ParseObject create and fetch in WP 7 application. In WP8 we have SDK, but in WP7 since there is no SDK we can use the REST API. GET is easy but for POST i can't find a workout.

The curl command is:

curl -X POST \
  -H "X-Parse-Application-Id: xxxxxxxxxx" \
  -H "X-Parse-REST-API-Key: xxxxxx" \
  -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
  -d '{"score":1337,"playerName":"Sean Plott","cheatMode":false}' \
  https://api.parse.com/1/classes/GameScore

How do I convert it to a equivalent WP7 request?

share|improve this question
    
If those are your real Application-Id and REST API Key's, I would strongly encourage you to redact them. You don't want that to be public information. – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 6 '14 at 2:53
    
Thanks buddy for the help. – Abhishek Dey Jul 7 '14 at 13:25
    
Do you still need help with this? I can provide an answer of you do – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 7 '14 at 15:33
    
@JohnathonSullinger sure I do. I still can't find a proper work around. – Abhishek Dey Jul 7 '14 at 15:40
    
I will get an answer posted. Give me a few minutes to get to a computer. – Johnathon Sullinger Jul 7 '14 at 15:41
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Let's take a look at the following parse documentation for creating a user

curl -X POST \
  -H "X-Parse-Application-Id: Your App ID" \
  -H "X-Parse-REST-API-Key: Your REST API Key" \
  -H "Content-Type: application/json" \
  -d '{"username":"cooldude6","password":"p_n7!-e8","phone":"415-392-0202"}' \
  https://api.parse.com/1/users

The Parse documentation shows that you must set your http request headers (-H represents headers) to specify your app id and your api key. You also add the content type as application/json to your headers.

Next, the documentation shows you post content in the body (which is what -d represents) that contains the user name and password.

So in order to create a new user, you must set up the headers and body properly. You can use an HttpWebRequest to handle this. In the following example, we create a new user on the Parse account.

Creating new User accounts

public async Task<User> CreateUserAsync(User user)
{
    // An anonymous Type that converts our properties to match the Parse API casing.
    var anonymousUser = new
    {
        email = user.Email.ToLower(),
        password = user.Password,
        username = user.UserName.ToLower(),
        userId = user.UserId,
    };

    // I use the Newtonsoft Json library to serialize the anonymous type to json
    // which is what the server expects (due to ContentType=application/json).
    string json = await JsonConvert.SerializeObjectAsync(anonymousUser);

    // Next we set up our request URL, headers Content Type.
    HttpWebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.CreateHttp(new Uri("https://api.parse.com/1/users"));
    request.Headers["X-Parse-Application-Id"] = "Your App ID";
    request.Headers["X-Parse-REST-API-Key"] = "Your REST API Key";
    request.ContentType = "application/json";

    // Since we are sending information to the server, we have to set the Method to POST.
    request.Method = "POST";

    Open a stream writer using the response stream provided by our request.       
    using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(await request.GetRequestStreamAsync()))
    {
        // Write our Json to the server.
        streamWriter.Write(json);
    }

    // Fetch a response from the server. This will give us back error codes or a successful code
    var response = await request.GetResponseAsync();
    string resultJson = string.Empty;

    // Convert Read the Json response in to a string
    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
    {
        resultJson = streamReader.ReadToEnd(); 
    }

    // Create an anonymous Type matching the response documented in the Parse API
    var deserializedObject = new
    {
        createdAt = string.Empty,
        objectId = string.Empty,
        sessionToken = string.Empty,
    };

    // Deserialize in to our response object.
    deserializedObject = JsonConvert.DeserializeAnonymousType(resultJson, deserializedObject);

    // Save the session token provided so we can use it later.
    // You will need to determine how you want to save this.
    await SaveSessionTokenAsync(deserializedObject.sessionToken);

    DateTime createdDate = DateTime.Now;
    DateTime.TryParse(deserializedObject.createdAt, out createdDate);
    user.CreatedDate = createdDate;

    // Return the newly created user.
    return user;
}

User model

The model user model is really simple.

public class User
{
    public string Username {get; set;}
    public string Password {get; set;}
    public string Email {get; set;}
    public Guid UserId {get; set;}
    public DateTime CreatedDate {get; set;}
}

The Parse documentation shows what you can expect back from the server as a response.

{
  "createdAt": "2011-11-07T20:58:34.448Z",
  "objectId": "g7y9tkhB7O",
  "sessionToken": "pnktnjyb996sj4p156gjtp4im"
}

We mimick this using the deserilizedObject anonymous Type above. So we can capture the sessionToken. You can take that session token and save it to your local disk. This way, each time the user re-opens the app, you can pass the session token to the server and get the user back without making the user login every time.

Be aware that storing the session token currently has a side-effect that probably won't effect anyone during production, but can be a bit annoying during development. If you create a new user, and save the session token, then delete the user from your dashboard, the session token remains valid and returns a cached user. I reported this as a bug and the Parse team are working on addressing it, but at the moment, deleting a user from the dashboard will not prevent a saved session token from continuing to work.

Restoring user state

The Parse API Documentation shows the following for getting a user.

curl -X GET \
  -H "X-Parse-Application-Id: Your App ID" \
  -H "X-Parse-REST-API-Key: Your REST API Key" \
  -H "X-Parse-Session-Token: pnktnjyb996sj4p156gjtp4im" \
  https://api.parse.com/1/users/me

This once again requires you to set up some headers, but you do not need to specify anything in the body. By pasing the session token to the url you will get back a user if it exists. You can then use the following to handle restoring the users state if you have saved the session token

    public async Task<User> GetUserAsync()
    {
        // I will leave how you save/load the session to you.
        string sessionToken = await LoadSessionTokenAsync();

        HttpWebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.CreateHttp(new Uri("https://api.parse.com/1/users"));
        request.Headers["X-Parse-Application-Id"] = "Your app ID";
        request.Headers["X-Parse-REST-API-Key"] = "Your REST API Key";
        request.Headers["X-Parse-Session-Token"] = sessionToken;
        request.Method = "GET";

        var response = await request.GetResponseAsync();
        string resultJson = string.Empty;
        using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            resultJson = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
        }

        var deserializedUser = new
        {
            username = string.Empty,
            email = string.Empty,
            userId = string.Empty,
            createdAt = string.Empty,
        };

        deserializedUser = JsonConvert.DeserializeAnonymousType(resultJson, deserializedUser);

        var user = new User
        {
            UserName = deserializedUser.username,
            Email = deserializedUser.email,
        };

        // Handle data conversions
        Guid guid = Guid.Empty;
        DateTime createdDate = DateTime.Now;
        Guid.TryParse(deserializedUser.userId, out guid);
        DateTime.TryParse(deserializedUser.createdAt, out createdDate);

        user.CreatedDate = createdDate;
        user.UserId = guid;

        return user;
    }

Logging a user in

Finally, the documentation shows the following for logging a user in to the service.

curl -X GET \
  -H "X-Parse-Application-Id: Your App ID" \
  -H "X-Parse-REST-API-Key: Your REST API Key" \
  -G \
  --data-urlencode 'username=cooldude6' \
  --data-urlencode 'password=p_n7!-e8' \
  https://api.parse.com/1/login

Here, we do not provide any body once again. The --data-urlencode simply means you must pass this data as part of the url. So essentially the URL would look like

https://api.parse.com/1/login/?username=cooldude6&password=p_n7!-e8

To demonstrate this, we once again set out self up to do a GET, but just tweak the URL a bit to include the url encoded data.

    public async Task<User> LoginAsync(string username, string password)
    {
        string url = string.Format("https://api.parse.com/1/login?username={0}&password={1}", username, password);
        HttpWebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.CreateHttp(new Uri(url));
        request.Headers["X-Parse-Application-Id"] = "Your App ID";
        request.Headers["X-Parse-REST-API-Key"] = "Your REST API Key";
        request.Method = "GET";

        var response = await request.GetResponseAsync();
        string resultJson = string.Empty;
        using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            resultJson = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
        }

        var deserializedUser = new
        {
            username = string.Empty,
            email = string.Empty,
            userId = string.Empty,
            createdAt = string.Empty,
        };

        deserializedUser = JsonConvert.DeserializeAnonymousType(resultJson, deserializedUser);

        var user = new User
        {
            UserName = deserializedUser.username,
            Email = deserializedUser.email,
        };

        // Handle data conversions
        Guid guid = Guid.Empty;
        DateTime createdDate = DateTime.Now;
        Guid.TryParse(deserializedUser.userId, out guid);
        DateTime.TryParse(deserializedUser.createdAt, out createdDate);

        user.CreatedDate = createdDate;
        user.UserId = guid;

        return user;
    }

Queries

Hopefully this provides you a good foundation on how to read their documentation and what the curl arguments represent. From what I've demonstrated above, you should be able to query for objects in the API without much of an issue. As an example, the documentation shows the following for queries.

curl -X GET \
  -H "X-Parse-Application-Id: Your App ID" \
  -H "X-Parse-REST-API-Key: Your REST API Key" \
  https://api.parse.com/1/classes/GameScore

This is nothing more than what we did with Getting the users. In this case, you don't need any session tokens. You just create an HttpWebRequest with the above URL, set your headers and call GetResponseAsync.

        HttpWebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.CreateHttp(new Uri("https://api.parse.com/1/classes/GameScore"));
        request.Headers["X-Parse-Application-Id"] = "Your App ID";
        request.Headers["X-Parse-REST-API-Key"] = "Your REST API Key";
        request.Method = "GET";

        var response = await request.GetResponseAsync();
        string resultJson = string.Empty;
        using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            // Get the Json, now you can deserialize it in to what ever represents your object.
            resultJson = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
        }

If you want to do conditional queries, the documentation says you just use an encoded url, just like we did for the username and password.

In this case, I would serialize an anonymous type into Json and provide that. Something along these lines.

        var query = new
        {
            playName = "Bob",
            cheatMode = "false",
        };

        string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(query);
        string url = string.Format("https://api.parse.com/1/classes/GameScore?where={0}", query);
        HttpWebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.CreateHttp(new Uri(url));
        request.Headers["X-Parse-Application-Id"] = "Your App ID";
        request.Headers["X-Parse-REST-API-Key"] = "Your REST API Key";
        request.Method = "GET";

        var response = await request.GetResponseAsync();
        string resultJson = string.Empty;
        using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
        {
            resultJson = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
        }

Hopefully this helps get you started with the API. With these examples, you should be able to use every one of the Parse REST API's without any issues.

Lastly, the following link can help you determine what the CURL options represent. http://curl.haxx.se/docs/manpage.html

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