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It appears that CollectionAssert cannot be used with generics. This is super frustrating; the code I want to test does use generics. What am I to do? Write boilerplate to convert between the two? Manually check collection equivalence?

This fails:

ICollection<IDictionary<string, string>> expected = // ...

IEnumerable<IDictionary<string, string>> actual = // ...

// error 1 and 2 here
CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected.GetEnumerator().ToList(), actual.ToList());

// error 3 here
Assert.IsTrue(expected.GetEnumerator().SequenceEquals(actual));

Compiler errors:

Error 1:

'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' does not contain a definition for 'ToList' and no extension method 'ToList' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' could be found

Error 2

'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' does not contain a definition for 'ToList' and no extension method 'ToList' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' could be found

Error 3

'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' does not contain a definition for 'SequenceEquals' and no extension method 'SequenceEquals' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator>' could be found

What am I doing wrong? Am I not using extensions correctly?

Update: Ok, this looks a bit better, but still doesn't work:

IEnumerable<IDictionary<string, string>> expected = // ...

IEnumerable<IDictionary<string, string>> actual = // ...

CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent(expected.ToList(), actual.ToList()); // fails
CollectionAssert.IsSubsetOf(expected.ToList(), actual.ToList()); // fails

I don't want to be comparing lists; I only care about set membership equality. The order of the members is unimportant. How can I get around this?

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Are you sure? It's been giving me compiler errors, which I will post tomorrow morning. –  Rosarch Mar 14 '10 at 5:19
    
I was wrong; CollectionAssert will NOT work on a ICollection<T>. It works with ICollection only. This has been requested on Connect, but so far not implemented. Possible work around: stackoverflow.com/questions/662458/… –  Mitch Wheat Mar 14 '10 at 5:28
    
If I recall correctly, the ICollection and ICollection<T> interfaces are VASTLY different. This is not the case of IEnumerable versus IEnumerable<T>. Please check their methods. ICollection is uses for something OTHER than ICollection<T>. ICollection doesn't even have ADD method - it is used for "more low-level" purposes like multithreading and marshalling. Therefore, I think you should rather find an interface that will suit your needs better, simple IEnumerable maybe? –  quetzalcoatl Mar 9 '12 at 11:12
    
"The order of the members is unimportant" - that's exactly what CollectionAssert.AreEquivalent is for. What is the failure message you get with the test? (maybe your expected and actual are not equivalent!) –  bacar Jun 18 '12 at 18:51
1  
It's SequenceEqual, not SequenceEquals, that's probably your compilation error –  Diego C. Jul 9 '12 at 18:48

3 Answers 3

You can use CollectionAssert with generic collections. The trick is to understand that the CollectionAssert methods operate on ICollection, and although few generic collection interfaces implement ICollection, List<T> does.

Thus, you can get around this limitation by using the ToList extension method:

IEnumerable<Foo> expected = //...
IEnumerable<Foo> actual = //...
CollectionAssert.AreEqual(expected.ToList(), actual.ToList());

That said, I still consider CollectionAssert broken in a lot of other ways, so I tend to use Assert.IsTrue with the LINQ extension methods, like this:

Assert.IsTrue(expected.SequenceEquals(actual));

FWIW, I'm currently using these extension methods to perform other comparisons:

public static class EnumerableExtension
{
    public static bool IsEquivalentTo(this IEnumerable first, IEnumerable second)
    {
        var secondList = second.Cast<object>().ToList();
        foreach (var item in first)
        {
            var index = secondList.FindIndex(item.Equals);
            if (index < 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
            secondList.RemoveAt(index);
        }
        return secondList.Count == 0;
    }

    public static bool IsSubsetOf(this IEnumerable first, IEnumerable second)
    {
        var secondList = second.Cast<object>().ToList();
        foreach (var item in first)
        {
            var index = secondList.FindIndex(item.Equals);
            if (index < 0)
            {
                return false;
            }
            secondList.RemoveAt(index);
        }
        return true;
    }
}
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This gives me compiler errors (see above). –  Rosarch Mar 14 '10 at 16:02
1  
You have to import the System.Linq namespace in a using directive. ToList is an extension method. –  Mark Seemann Mar 14 '10 at 17:40
    
I added using System.Linq; but it still doesn't work: 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary‌​<string,string>>' does not contain a definition for 'ToList' and no extension method 'ToList' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerator<System.Collections.Generic.IDictionary<s‌​tring,string>>' could be found –  Rosarch Mar 14 '10 at 17:55
    
ToList doesn't extend IEnumerator<T>, it extends IEnumerable<T>. Remove the call to GetEnumerator(). –  Mark Seemann Mar 14 '10 at 18:47
    
Right right. Ok, but I still have the problem that this is comparing lists, but I don't care about the order of objects in the collection. I'm just working with sets. –  Rosarch Mar 14 '10 at 19:52

If you are working with Sets, then use this Idiom

HashSet<string> set1  = new HashSet<string>(){"A","B"};
HashSet<string> set2  = new HashSet<string>(){"B","A"};

Assert.IsTrue(set1.SetEquals(set2));
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You could easily write your own generic version, then move it to a base or utility class that's used in all of your tests. Base it on the LINQ operators like All and Any.

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