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What's the point in keeping a different kernel stack for each process in linux?

Why not keep just one stack for the kernel to work with?

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closed as too broad by shellter, Uli Köhler, Frank van Puffelen, davidkonrad, GingerHead Jun 25 '14 at 22:25

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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This question: stackoverflow.com/questions/886807/… has some related information – Innot Kauker Jun 25 '14 at 16:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What's the point in keeping a different kernel stack for each process in linux?

It simplifies pre-emption of processes in the kernel space.

Why not keep just one stack for the kernel to work with?

It would be a night mare to implement pre-emption without seperates stacks.


Separate kernel stacks are not really mandated. Each architecture is free to do whatever it wants. If there was no per-emption during a system call, then a single kernel stack might make sense.

However, *nix has processes and each process can make a system call. However, Linux allows one task to be pre-empted during a write(), etc and another task to schedule. The kernel stack is a snapshot of the context of kernel work that is being performed for each process.

Also, the per-process kernel stacks come with little overhead. A thread_info or some mechanism to get the process information from assembler is needed. This is at least a page allocation. By placing the kernel mode stack in the same location, a simple mask can get the thread_info from assembler. So, we already need the per-process variable and allocation. Why not use it as a stack to store kernel context and allow pre-emption during system calls?

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Why not keep just one stack for the kernel to work with?

In this case only one process/thread would be able to enter the kernel at a time.

Basically, each thread has its own stack, and crossing the user-space to kernel boundary does not change this fact. Kernel also has its own kernel threads (not belonging to any user-space process) and they all have their own stacks.

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