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I want to reverse each individual word of a String in Java (not the entire string, just each individual word).

Example: if input String is "Hello World" then the output should be "olleH dlroW".

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26 Answers 26

up vote 83 down vote accepted

This should do the trick. This will iterate through each word in the source string, reverse it using StringBuilder's built-in reverse() method, and output the reversed word.

String source = "Hello World";

for (String part : source.split(" ")) {
    System.out.print(new StringBuilder(part).reverse().toString());
    System.out.print(" ");
}

Output:

olleH dlroW 

Notes: Commenters have correctly pointed out a few things that I thought I should mention here. This example will append an extra space to the end of the result. It also assumes your words are separated by a single space each and your sentence contains no punctuation.

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4  
It sounds like a homework, using built-in methods are not acceptable. –  fastcodejava Mar 14 '10 at 7:47
1  
+1 just wanted to answer this. Note that you have an excess blank at the end –  Peter Kofler Mar 14 '10 at 7:48
1  
Probably, but I'll leave this answer here since the question didn't specify whether it is homework-related. –  William Brendel Mar 14 '10 at 7:49
3  
@fastcodejava - in some peoples' minds, complete answers to homework questions are unacceptable ... cos' ultimately it doesn't help the OP. –  Stephen C Mar 14 '10 at 7:50
1  
This ignores unicode diacritics and other unicode multicharacter String problems. See my answer for a solution that does: stackoverflow.com/a/20279110/9636 –  Heath Borders Nov 29 '13 at 5:44

Know your libraries ;-)

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils;

String reverseWords(String sentence) {
    return StringUtils.reverseDelimited(StringUtils.reverse(sentence), ' ');
}
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You need to do this on each word after you split into an array of words.

public reverse(String word) {
    char[] chs = word.toCharArray();

    int i=0, j=chs.length-1;
    while (i < j) {
        // swap chs[i] and chs[j]
        char t = chs[i];
        chs[i] = chs[j];
        chs[j] = t;
       i++; j--;
    }
}
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2  
This will not work if there are surrogate pairs in the text. –  Péter Török Mar 14 '10 at 14:16
    
Could you explain more? –  fastcodejava Mar 14 '10 at 15:00
    
surrogate pairs are a feature of unicode, in which (if I understand correctly) instead of 16 bits forming one unicode character, you get a pair of 16bit characters forming one character. Google for "surrogate pair" for more info. –  CPerkins Mar 14 '10 at 15:15

Here's the simplest solution that doesn't even use any loops.

public class olleHdlroW {
    static String reverse(String in, String out) {
        return (in.isEmpty()) ? out :
            (in.charAt(0) == ' ')
            ? out + ' ' + reverse(in.substring(1), "")
            : reverse(in.substring(1), in.charAt(0) + out);
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        System.out.println(reverse("Hello World", ""));
    }
}

Even if this is homework, feel free to copy it and submit it as your own. You'll either get an extra credit (if you can explain how it works) or get caught for plagiarism (if you can't).

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2  
Could you explain in more detail? Seems to complicated. –  fastcodejava Mar 14 '10 at 9:06
1  
Hint: think WHAT instead of HOW. –  polygenelubricants Mar 14 '10 at 10:56
10  
I guess this solution goes to the possible lisp homework, only implemented in java :) –  Azder Mar 14 '10 at 11:07
2  
a recursive loop is still a loop ;) –  Jorn Mar 14 '10 at 12:22
2  
This will throw an exception in case the last character of the string is a space. –  Abbondanza Jan 9 '13 at 8:47

No one here is considering unicode characters. You need to use java.text.BreakIterator to find word boundaries and then use another one within each word boundary to enumerate character boundaries:

String helloWorld = "He\u0308llo World"; // Hëllo World
StringBuilder reverseStringBuilder = new StringBuilder(helloWorld.length());
BreakIterator wordBreakIterator = BreakIterator.getWordInstance();
wordBreakIterator.setText(helloWorld);

int wordStart = wordIterator.first();
int wordEnd = wordIterator.next();

while (wordEnd != BreakIterator.DONE) {
    String word = helloWorld.substring(wordStart,wordEnd);
    if (Character.isLetterOrDigit(word.charAt(0))) {
        // "Hello" or "World" in our example
        BreakIterator characterBreakIterator = BreakIterator.getCharacterInstance();
        characterBreakIterator.setText(word);
        int characterEnd = characterBreakIterator.last();
        int characterStart = characterBreakIterator.previous();
        while (characterStart != BreakIterator.DONE) {
            reverseStringBuilder.append(word.substring(characterStart, characterEnd));

            characterEnd = characterStart;
            characterStart = characterBreakIterator.previous();
        }
    } else {
        // " " in our example
        reverseStringBuilder.append(word);
    }
    wordStart = wordEnd;
    wordEnd = wordIterator.next();
}

String dlroWolleh = reverseStringBuilder.toString(); // "dlroW ollëH"

Using naive methods above will shift the diacritic character \u0308 above the first l when you reverse the String. You want it to stay above the e.

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2  
I used a native method (utilizes StringBuilder and String.charAt() methods) to reverse the string 'He\u0308llo World'. My output was 'dlroW oll̈eH'. Code: private void reverseString(String input) { try { StringBuilder build = new StringBuilder(); for(int i=input.length()-1; i>=0; i--){ build.append(input.charAt(i)); } logp.info("reversed: "+build.toString()); } catch (Exception e) { logp.error(e.getMessage(), e); } } –  Quest Monger Jan 24 at 0:45

I'm assuming you could just print the results (you just said 'the output should be...') ;-)

String str = "Hello World";
for (String word : str.split(" "))
    reverse(word);

void reverse(String s) {
    for (int idx = s.length() - 1; idx >= 0; idx--) 
        System.out.println(s.charAt(idx));
}

Or returning the reversed String:

String str = "Hello World";
StringBuilder reversed = new StringBuilder();
for (String word : str.split(" ")) {
  reversed.append(reverse(word));
  reversed.append(' ');
}
System.out.println(reversed);

String reverse(String s) {
  StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
  for (int idx = s.length() - 1; idx >= 0; idx--)
      b.append(s.charAt(idx));
  return b.toString();
}
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Well I'm a C/C++ guy, practicing java for interviews let me know if something can be changed or bettered. The following allows for multiple spaces and newlines.

First one is using StringBuilder

public static String reverse(String str_words){
    StringBuilder sb_result = new StringBuilder(str_words.length());
    StringBuilder sb_tmp = new StringBuilder();
    char c_tmp;
    for(int i = 0; i < str_words.length(); i++){
        c_tmp = str_words.charAt(i);    
        if(c_tmp == ' ' || c_tmp == '\n'){
            if(sb_tmp.length() != 0){   
                sb_tmp.reverse();
                sb_result.append(sb_tmp);
                sb_tmp.setLength(0);
            }   
            sb_result.append(c_tmp);
        }else{
            sb_tmp.append(c_tmp);
        }
    } 
    if(sb_tmp.length() != 0){
        sb_tmp.reverse();
        sb_result.append(sb_tmp);
    }
    return sb_result.toString();
}

This one is using char[]. I think its more efficient...

public static String reverse(String str_words){
    char[] c_array = str_words.toCharArray();
    int pos_start = 0;
    int pos_end;
    char c, c_tmp; 
    int i, j, rev_length;
    for(i = 0; i < c_array.length; i++){
        c = c_array[i];
        if( c == ' ' || c == '\n'){
            if(pos_start != i){ 
                pos_end = i-1;
                rev_length = (i-pos_start)/2;
                for(j = 0; j < rev_length; j++){
                    c_tmp = c_array[pos_start+j];
                    c_array[pos_start+j] = c_array[pos_end-j];
                    c_array[pos_end-j] = c_tmp;
                }
            }
            pos_start = i+1;
        }
    }
    //redundant, if only java had '\0' @ end of string
    if(pos_start != i){
        pos_end = i-1;
        rev_length = (i-pos_start)/2;
        for(j = 0; j < rev_length; j++){
            c_tmp = c_array[pos_start+j];
            c_array[pos_start+j] = c_array[pos_end-j];
            c_array[pos_end-j] = c_tmp;
        }
    }   
    return new String(c_array);
}
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18  
Yep, you are a C++ guy. –  Michael Jun 12 '13 at 13:14

Taking into account that the separator can be more than one space/tab and that we want to preserve them:

public static String reverse(String string)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(string.length());
    StringBuilder wsb = new StringBuilder(string.length());
    for (int i = 0; i < string.length(); i++)
    {
        char c = string.charAt(i);
        if (c == '\t' || c == ' ')
        {
            if (wsb.length() > 0)
            {
                sb.append(wsb.reverse().toString());
                wsb = new StringBuilder(string.length() - sb.length());
            }
            sb.append(c);
        }
        else
        {
            wsb.append(c);
        }
    }
    if (wsb.length() > 0)
    {
        sb.append(wsb.reverse().toString());
    }
    return sb.toString();

}
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Heres a method that takes a string and reverses it.

public String reverse ( String s ) {
            int length = s.length(), last = length - 1;
            char[] chars = s.toCharArray();
            for ( int i = 0; i < length/2; i++ ) {
                char c = chars[i];
                chars[i] = chars[last - i];
                chars[last - i] = c;
            }
            return new String(chars);
        }

First you need to split the string into words like this

String sample = "hello world";  
String[] words = sample.split(" ");  
share|improve this answer
    String input = "Hello World!";

    String temp = "";
    String result = "";

    for (int i = 0; i <= input.length(); i++) {
        if (i != input.length() && input.charAt(i) != ' ') {
            temp = input.charAt(i) + temp;
        } else {
            result = temp + " " + result;
            temp = "";
        }
    }

    System.out.println("the result is: " + result);
share|improve this answer

Using only substring() and recursion:

public String rev(String rest) {
    if (rest.equals(""))
        return "";
    return rev(rest.substring(1)) + rest.substring(0,1);
}
share|improve this answer
    
looks well, method get called 12 times, 11 times to switch the letter, once to return the final string. –  Dominik Feininger Dec 16 '13 at 1:58
public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(eatWord(new StringBuilder("Hello World This Is Tony's Code"), new StringBuilder(), new StringBuilder()));
    }
static StringBuilder eatWord(StringBuilder feed, StringBuilder swallowed, StringBuilder digested) {
    for (int i = 0, size = feed.length(); i <= size; i++) {
        if (feed.indexOf(" ") == 0 || feed.length() == 0) {
            digested.append(swallowed + " ");
            swallowed = new StringBuilder();
        } else {
            swallowed.insert(0, feed.charAt(0));
        }
        feed = (feed.length() > 0)  ? feed.delete(0, 1) : feed ;
    }
    return digested;
}

run:

olleH dlroW sihT sI s'ynoT edoC 
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)
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Using split(), you just have to change what you wish to split on.

public static String reverseString(String str)
{
    String[] rstr;
    String result = "";
    int count = 0;
    rstr = str.split(" ");
    String words[] = new String[rstr.length];
    for(int i = rstr.length-1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        words[count] = rstr[i];
        count++;
    }

    for(int j = 0; j <= words.length-1; j++)
    {
        result += words[j] + " ";
    }

    return result;


}
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you forgotten to reverse each word. –  elyashiv Oct 28 '12 at 13:23

I came up with this answer while working on the problem. I tried not to use nested for loop solution O(N^2). I kind of forced myself to use stack for fun :D

    public StringBuilder reverseWord(String input) {
        char separator = ' ';
        char[] chars = input.toCharArray();
        Stack<Character> stack = new Stack<Character>();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(chars.length);


        for(int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {

            if(chars[i] != separator) { //letters
                stack.push(chars[i]);

                //if not last letter don't go any further
                if(i != chars.length - 1) { continue; }

            }

            while(!stack.isEmpty()) {
                sb.append(stack.pop());
            }
            sb.append(separator);

        }
        //remove the last separator
        sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length() - 1);
        return sb;
    }
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String someString = new String("Love thy neighbor");
    System.out.println(someString);
    char[] someChar = someString.toCharArray();
    int j = someChar.length - 1;
    char temp;
    for (int i = 0; i <= someChar.length / 2; i++) {
        temp = someChar[i];
        someChar[i] = someChar[j];
        someChar[j] = temp;
        j--;
    }
    someString = new String(someChar);
    System.out.println(someString);

Run:

Love thy neighbor
robhgien yht evoL
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1  
That reverses the entire string. –  phatfingers Jul 28 '13 at 22:21

Dare I say (with all due respect)that the accepted answer in my opinion is not good .

What about just this below nothing fancy.

 public static void main(String[] args) {   
    String test = "Hello World";
    StringBuilder reverse = new StringBuilder();
    for(int i =test.length()-1 ; i >= 0;i--){           
        reverse.append(test.charAt(i));
    }       
    System.out.println(reverse);
}
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class ReverseWordsInString{
    public static String reverse(String s1){
            int l = s1.length();
            if (l>1)
                    return(s1.substring(l-1) + reverse(s1.substring(0,l-1)));
            else
                    return(s1.substring(0));
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
            String st = "Hello My World!";
            String r = "";
            for (String word : st.split(" "))
                    r += " "+ reverse(word);
            System.out.println("Reversed words in the given string: "+r.trim());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This uses recursion so you will eventually get a stack overflow. Would you be able to add a few lines explaining why you think this version is an improvement over the many existing answers? –  Burhan Ali Aug 15 '13 at 22:43
    
Hi Burhan,This is not an improved version as such. Further this is not the correct answer here because it doesn't reverse it word by word. I didn't read the question but posted by answer for reversing a whole string. This program doesn't use loop but use recursion and doesn't cause stack overflow. It is just another way to do it. It can be modified to use reversing each word by spliting the string into words and calling reverse function for each word. –  dganesh2002 Aug 15 '13 at 23:08
    
Burhan, I have reposted the corrected answer to satisfy the exact requirements. Please note that this is just another logic that I could come up with. –  dganesh2002 Aug 15 '13 at 23:17
    
@BurhanAli it doesn't give stack overfloe error.. –  dganesh2002 Sep 27 '13 at 20:24

Use split() function and reverse individual words

    public String reverseSentence(String input)
      {
        String[] words = input.split(" ");
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        for (String s : words)
        {
            String rev = " ";
            for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
            {
                rev = s.charAt(i) + rev;
            }

            builder.append(rev);
        }

        return builder.toString().trim();
      }

Remove the extra space that is added at the end of the new String using trim()

Output:

    This is my sentence        
    sihT si ym ecnetnes        
share|improve this answer
public String reverse(String arg) {
    char[] s = arg.toCharArray();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    boolean reverse = false;
    boolean isChar = false;
    int insertPos = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < s.length; i++) {
        isChar = Character.isAlphabetic(s[i]);
        if (!reverse && isChar) {
            sb.append(s[i]);
            insertPos = i;
            reverse = true;
        } else if (reverse && isChar) {
            sb.insert(insertPos, s[i]);
        } else if (!reverse && !isChar) {
            sb.append(s[i]);
        } else if (reverse && !isChar) {
            reverse = false;
            sb.append(s[i]);
        }
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
It's helpful to provide an explanation along with the code –  krsteeve Dec 16 '13 at 1:09
 package MujeebWorkspace.helps;
 // javamujeeb@gmail.com

 public class Mujeeb {

     static String str= "This code is simple to reverse the word without changing positions";
     static String[] reverse = str.split(" ");

     public static void main(String [] args){  
         reverseMethod();
     }

     public static void reverseMethod(){
         for (int k=0; k<=reverse.length-1; k++) {
             String word =reverse[reverse.length-(reverse.length-k)];
             String subword = (word+" ");
             String [] splitsubword = subword.split("");

             for (int i=subword.length(); i>0; i--){
                 System.out.print(splitsubword[i]);  
             }
         }
     }
 }
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        String input = "Welcome To The Java Programming";
        String output  = "";
        String[] cutAry = input.split("\\s+");
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        for(String s:cutAry){
            sb.append(s);
            output += sb.reverse().toString()+" ";
            sb.replace(0, sb.length(), "");
        }
        System.out.println(output);
share|improve this answer

This reverses the words in the given string. Words are assumed to be separated by a single space. Reversal is done in place (in the character buffer).

public static String reversePhrases(String s)
{
    char[] buf = s.toCharArray();
    int len = buf.length;
    int start = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        if (buf[i] == ' ' || i == (len-1)) {
            if (i == (len-1)) {
                i = len;
            }
            int end = (start + i)/2;
            for (int j = start; j < end; j++) {
                char c = buf[j];
                int pos = (start + i) - j - 1;
                buf[j] = buf[pos];
                buf[pos] = c;
            }
            start = i + 1;    
        }
    }
    return new String(buf);
}
share|improve this answer

The one of easiest ways:

public String reverse(String post)
{       
    String backward = "";
    for(int i = post.length()-1; i >= 0; i--) {
        backward = backward + post.substring(i, i+1);
    }        
    return backward;
} 
share|improve this answer

Easy way:

String reverseString(String string)
{
    String newString = "";
    for(int x = string.length() - 1; x > -1; x ++)
        newString += string.charAt(x);
    return newString;
}
share|improve this answer

if its to reverse each letter than this for loop works nicely:

for(int i = 0; i < input.length(); i++){
    output = output + input.substring((input.length()-i)-1, input.length()-i);
}
share|improve this answer

I hope this will be useful for someone.

public class ReverseString {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String a="abrakadabra";
    String b=reverse(a);
    System.out.print(b);
}
    public static String reverse(String b){
        String j="";
        int a=b.length();           
        for (int x=a;x>0;x--){          
        j=j+b.substring(x-1,x);}

        return j;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This reverses the entire string, not individual words in the string. Also when answering an old question like this try to ensure that your answer adds something that the other answers have missed –  Richard Tingle Sep 4 '13 at 11:08
    
Also repeatedly "adding" strings like this is slow, a string builder is tbe usual technique –  Richard Tingle Sep 4 '13 at 11:10

protected by animuson Jul 21 at 3:10

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