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I'm using sage, python and CSV.

Here is an example row from my csv file:

"(4, 4)",0.921,1.512,1.718,"[[(0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]","[[(0, 0, 3), (1, 0, 0)]]"

I also have:

with open('log.csv', 'rt') as logFile:
    logreader = csv.reader(logFile)
    for row in logreader:
        a = row[3]
        b = row[4]

I was expecting csv.reader to strip the double-quotes when assigning a and b such that:

a == [[(0, 0.5, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]
b == [[(0, 0, 3), (1, 0, 0)]]

however

a == "[[(0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]"
b == "[[(0, 0, 3), (1, 0, 0)]]"

What is the best way to achieve what I was expecting? Thanks

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To anyone that is having this problem when using sage, make sure that all numbers are either int or float, NOT rational. This should fix things –  The Ref Jun 25 at 18:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to use ast.literal_eval to parse the strings into lists:

from ast import literal_eval
with open('log.csv', 'rt') as logFile:
    logreader = csv.reader(logFile)
    for row in logreader:
        a = literal_eval(row[3])
        b = literal_eval(row[4])

See a demonstration below:

>>> from ast import literal_eval
>>> literal_eval("[[(0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]")
[[(0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]
>>> type(literal_eval("[[(0, 0, 1), (1, 0, 0)]]"))
<class 'list'>
>>>
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I tried using literal_eval but got ValueError: malformed string, I believe this is to do with having Sage Rationals in the tuples. Thanks for your help –  The Ref Jun 25 at 18:10
    
@TheRef - Yes, that is the cause. If you look at the documentation for ast.literal_eval, you will see that it can only parse strings, bytes, numbers (which are ints, floats, and complex), tuples, lists, dicts, sets, booleans, and None. In other words, it can only handle the basic Python datatypes. –  iCodez Jun 25 at 18:23

I would use the built-in strip function:

a = row[3].strip('"')
b = row[4].strip('"')
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