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To increment an int "i", I can use any of the following:

i++;
i = i + 1;
i = i++;

...with the same result, as this code shows:

int finalVal = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 42; i++)
{
    //i++; 
    //i = i + 1; 
    i = i++; 
    finalVal = i;
}
MessageBox.Show(finalVal.ToString()); // in each case I get "41"

Is there any reason to prefer one style of incrementing an int over the other, or is it a case of "six of one, a half dozen of the other, and 6.0 of the yet other"?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bjb568, Lynn Crumbling, codeMagic, TGMCians, rene Sep 23 at 20:19

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5  
i = i++ does not change the value of i. (Well it does, but then it assigns the original value back to i). But you forgot i += 1. There is no difference between i++, i += 1, and i = i + 1. –  p.s.w.g Jun 25 at 18:48
2  
You forgot Interlocked.Increment(ref i); /s –  Ilya Kozhevnikov Jun 25 at 18:49
1  
i = i++; is not a correct way of incrementing i; –  Dennis_E Jun 25 at 18:50
2  
Also, did you notice that you've got i++ in the increment portion of your for loop? It seems like it shouldn't be there, given the context, but that's probably why you didn't notice that i = i++ does nothing. –  p.s.w.g Jun 25 at 18:52
1  
you probably wanted i = ++i; which is just the same as ++i; –  CSharpie Jun 25 at 18:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would prefer i++ over the other two because it expresses a common idiom.

Those lines of code all end up doing exactly the same thing. But if I'm scanning code for an increment, the ++ just sort of jumps off the page.

Also, the i = i++ is actually incorrect. You meant i = ++i.

Short answer: Technically no, but stylistically, yes.

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They are not same.

  • i++; would give the value of i before increment, incremented value would be visible on next usage of i

Sample Code:

int i = 1;
Console.WriteLine(i++); //print 1
Console.WriteLine(i);   //print 2
  • i = i + 1; would increment i and you will see the change right away.
  • i = i++; , doesn't change the value of i, since i++ would return the original value not the incremented one and that will be assigned back to i, keep the original value.

The reason your code prints 41 is because you are not changing the value of i inside your loop, with i = i++, i is incremented due to the loop's i++ and that value is retained by finalVal

int finalVal = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 42; i++) //i is incremented here
{
    //i++; 
    //i = i + 1; 
    i = i++;      //No Change in i , this statement equals to i = i;
    finalVal = i; // finalVal is keeping value of i
}
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I've seen i++ cause confusion for people new to programming, because it's anything but obvious by the syntax alone that it evaluates to the previous value of i. Even you got it wrong:

i = i++;

This does not do the same thing as

i = ++i;

or

i = i + 1;

Furthermore, in C++, i++ can be less efficient as it may require the construction of an unnecessary temporary object.

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I bet you it is at least somewhat inefficient in C# too. The reference for the postfix ops is here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691363%28v=vs.71%29.aspx, and an elaborate discussion by Eric Lippert is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3346450/…. The point is the saving of the operand in a temporary. That probably is just a memcpy, but still. (And, for user defined types, couldn't that be semantically wrong?) If not, say if Clone() was invoked, it could be really expensive, but that should be mentioned somewhere. –  Peter Schneider Jun 25 at 19:24

I would rewrite your code something like this to fully understand what's going on.

int ipp, ipone, ippass;
ipp = ipone = ippass =  0;
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    ipp++; 
    ipone = i + 1; 
    ippass = ippass++; 

    MessageBox.Show(" Loop Counter: " + i + "\n IPlusPlus: " + ipp + "\n IPlusOne: " + ipone + "\n IPlusPlusAssigned: " + ippass );

}

You might want to lower the loop count, as you're going to get a whole lot of message boxes.

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