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I am writing a linux kernel module that creates a block device which lists the process list.

I am able to display the list in the kernel log file but now I am trying to display the output to stdout. My aim is to create a big string in dev_open() that contains all the processes and then copy that string to the buffer which goes to the dev_read() function.

However, I am trying the following code but I get a message to stdout saying "Killed".

What does this mean ? How can I solve this.

Code ::

#include <linux/module.h>
#include<linux/sched.h>
#include <linux/string.h>
#include <linux/fs.h>
#include <asm/uaccess.h>
#include <linux/proc_fs.h>
#include <linux/kernel.h>

static int dev_open(struct inode *, struct file *);
static int dev_rls(struct inode *, struct file *);
static ssize_t dev_read(struct file *, char *, size_t, loff_t *);

int len,temp;
char msg[1000];
int tem;
static struct file_operations fops =
{
    .read = dev_read,
    .open = dev_open,
    .release = dev_rls,
};

int init_module(void)
{
    int t = register_chrdev(81,"tempo",&fops);

    if(t<0) printk(KERN_ALERT "Device failed to register!");
    else printk(KERN_ALERT "Registered device...\n");
    return t;
}

static int dev_open(struct inode *inod, struct file *fil)
{
    struct task_struct *task;   
    for_each_process(task)
    {
        printk("%s [%d]\n",task->comm, task->pid);
        strcat(&msg[0],task->comm);
        len=strlen(msg);
        temp=len;
        tem++;
    }
        printk("%s [%d]\n",task->comm , task->pid);

   return 0;
 }

void cleanup_module(void)
{
    unregister_chrdev(81,"tempo");
}

static ssize_t dev_read(struct file *filp,char *buf,size_t count,loff_t *offp)
{
    printk("Hi\n");
     if(count>temp)
   {
    count=temp;
   }
    temp=temp-count;
    copy_to_user(buf,msg, count);
    if(count==0)
       temp=len;

   return count;

   //return 0;
} 


static int dev_rls(struct inode *inod, struct file *fil)
{
    printk(KERN_ALERT"Done with device\n");
   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
It's entirely possible that you're writing beyond the end of msg, since it's only 1000 bytes long and you have no limitation on the length. Are you getting a kernel stack trace in dmesg/syslog (or on the console)? –  Gil Hamilton Jun 27 at 19:57
    
Also, your logic in dev_read doesn't really make sense to me. Probably you're intending to copy out up to count bytes (but no more than are available in msg), but I don't think that's what it actually does. Work through an example where there are, say, 800 bytes in msg, but the user does a read of 5 bytes, then another 5 and so forth. Watch what happens to your state variables. –  Gil Hamilton Jun 27 at 19:58

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