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Maybe someone can help me with this strange thing:

If a user clicks on a button, a new UITableView is pushed to the navigation controller. This new view is doing some database querying which takes some time. Therefore I wanted to do the loading in background.

What works WITHOUT leaking memory (but freezes the screen until everything is done):

WorkController *tmp=[[WorkController alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewStyleGrouped];
self.workController=tmp;
[tmp release];

[self.workController loadList]; // Does the DB Query
[self.workController pushViewController:self.workController animated:YES];  

Now I tried to do this:

    // Show Wait indicator
    ....

    WorkController *tmp=[[WorkController alloc] initWithStyle:UITableViewStyleGrouped];
    self.workController=tmp;
    [tmp release];

    [self performSelectorInBackground:@selector(getController) withObject:nil];
}

-(void) getController {
    [self.workController loadList]; // Does the DB Query
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:self.workController animated:YES];
}

This also works but is leaking memory and I don't know why ! Can you help ?

By the way - is it possible for an App to get into AppStore with a small memory leak ? Or will this be checked first of all ?

Thanks in advance !

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1  
Where's the leak? –  Jacob Relkin Mar 14 '10 at 10:46
    
Hi, leak is within the getController method. –  Steblo Mar 14 '10 at 10:56
    
Um, where? You don't release workController?? –  Jacob Relkin Mar 14 '10 at 10:59

2 Answers 2

No, small memory leaks will not (most likely) you application to be rejected from appstore.

In your example as you run your method in separate thread you should create and dispose NSAutoreleasePool object for that thread to handle autoreleased objects. Following changes to getController method should do the trick:

-(void) getController {
    NSAutoreleasedPool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasedPool alloc] init];

    [self.workController loadList]; // Does the DB Query
    [self.navigationController pushViewController:self.workController animated:YES];

    [pool release];
}

For more details see Autorelease Pools section in memory management guide. Relevant quote from there:

If you spawn a secondary thread, you must create your own autorelease pool as soon as the thread begins executing; otherwise, you will leak objects. (See “Autorelease Pools and Threads” for details.)

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First of all - thanks for your reply. But where is the NSAutorelease Pool used ? Isn't it just allocated and released ? –  Steblo Mar 14 '10 at 10:55
    
Thanks ! Using pool did the trick. It works now without leaking (and it IS possible to push a view to stack in background thread) –  Steblo Mar 14 '10 at 11:05
1  
NSAutoreleasePool handles autoreleased objects and make sure that they will be actually released. Although you it looks like you just create and release it it does a lot of work. –  Vladimir Mar 14 '10 at 11:12

Btw, you're calling pushViewController: from a background thread. This is bad.

You should only do things to the UI - like pushing view controllers and changing UI items - from the main thread. If you don't, things break.

See the Cocoa Fundamentals Guide section titled "Are the Cocoa Frameworks Thread Safe?": it says "All UIKit objects should be used on the main thread only."

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