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Is it possible to write a IEqualityComparer for a SortedList <double, GameObject> that will return the 'next-closest' double?

For example;

SortedList <double, GameObject> list = new SortedList <double, GameObject>(new MyComparer());
list[0.00] = go1;
list[1.00] = go2;

list[0.55]; // should return go2. Ie, find the next-closest key, value pair 
            // and return that

Is it possible to do this? Do I use a IEqualityComparer to achieve this?

#region Comparator
public class MyComparer : IEqualityComparer<double> // should this be Pair<double, GameObject> instead?
{
    public bool Equals(double a, double b)
    {
        return (Math.Abs(a-b) <= 0.01);
    }

}
#endregion

PS: If I add my own custom comparer (IEqualityComparer) - will the sorting and searching algorithm of my SortedList still remain as Binary Search? By changing the comparer have I just made the SortedList much less efficient? Have I just made lookup and insertion less efficient?

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Sort algorithm vary depending on the .NET framework version. Equality comparer has nothing to do with sorting. Sort uses an IComparer<T> (or indirectly IComparer, IComparable<T>, IComparable) –  Simon Mourier Jun 26 at 5:59
    
You should be very careful about doing things like this, changing the meaning of interfaces like that, and in particular equality. I would highly suggest you not do this, regardless of which interface you end up changing. As an example, if x == y and y == z then you should have x == z, but if you start doing "close enough" comparison, you might not allow this. For instance, if "close enough" is 0.5 or lower between, then 0.5 == 1.0 and 1.0 == 1.5 but 0.5 != 1.5 (with your new == and != operators that is). Don't do this! Find a different way of expressing your intent. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 26 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

Please use the following program for this fix. and yes there will be a little overhead due to rounding. if you retrieve 0.45 it will return you A and 1.55 it will return you C.

  class SortedListTest
    {
        public static void Test()
        {
            var list = new SortedList<double, string>(new MyComparer());

            list[0.00] = "A";
            list[1.00] = "B";
            list[2.00] = "C";

            Console.WriteLine(list[0.55]);
        }
        private static void Main()
        {
            SortedListTest.Test();
        }
    }

    internal class MyComparer : IComparer<double>
    {
        public int Compare(double x, double y)
        {
            return (int) (Math.Round(x) - Math.Round(y));
        }

    }
share|improve this answer
    
You'll get an exception if your list doesn't contain the key that you are rounding to. –  LVBen Jun 26 at 5:02
    
@KajalSinha thanks for the answer but this will only work for ints. –  Jake M Jun 26 at 5:02
    
@Jake M : It will work for double and you are comparing double. You can even compare at a decimal place if you wish to. The compare method returns either less than 0 or 0 or greater than 0. Less than 0 means select the lower bound during comparison and greater than 0 means select the upper bound. –  Kajal Sinha Jun 26 at 5:08

I strongly doubt that is possible. The Equals method of your IQualityComparer doesn't even get called when indexing the SortedList with a double!

I would recommend creating a new class that inherits from SortedList and overrides the Indexer ([]).

This example will return the value of the next highest key. If there is no higher key, then it will return the value of the highest key:

   class Program
   {
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         var list = new MySortedList();

         list[0.5] = "A";
         list[1.0] = "B";
         list[3.0] = "C";

         Console.WriteLine(list[-0.6]); // writes: A
         Console.WriteLine(list[0.1]); // writes: A
         Console.WriteLine(list[0.6]); // writes: B
         Console.WriteLine(list[1.1]); // writes: C
         Console.WriteLine(list[1.2]); // writes: C
         Console.WriteLine(list[4.0]); // writes: C
      }
   }

   class MySortedList : SortedList<double, string>
   {
      new public string this[double key]
      {
         get
         {
            double newKey = Keys.FirstOrDefault(p => p >= key);
            if (!Keys.Contains(newKey)) newKey = Keys.Max();
            return base[newKey];
         }
         set
         {
            base[key] = value;
         }
      }
   }
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