Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i want to create an alias for a class name. The following syntax would be perfect:

public class LongClassNameOrOneThatContainsVersionsOrDomainSpecificName
{
   ...
}

public class MyName = LongClassNameOrOneThatContainsVersionOrDomainSpecificName;

but it won't compile.


Example

Note This example is provided for convience only. Don't try to solve this particular problem by suggesting changing the design of the entire system. The presence, or lack, of this example doesn't change the original question.

Some existing code depends on the presence of a static class:

public static class ColorScheme
{
   ...
}

This color scheme is the Outlook 2003 color scheme. i want to introduce an Outlook 2007 color scheme, while retaining the Outlook 2003 color scheme:

public static class Outlook2003ColorScheme
{
   ...
}

public static class Outlook2007ColorScheme
{
   ...
}

But i'm still faced with the fact that the code depends on the presence of a static class called ColorScheme. My first thought was to create a ColorScheme class that i will descend from either Outlook2003 or Outlook2007:

public static class ColorScheme : Outlook2007ColorScheme
{
}

but you cannot descend from a static class.

My next thought was to create the static ColorScheme class, but make Outlook2003ColorScheme and Outlook2007ColorScheme classes non-static. Then a static variable in the static ColorScheme class can point to either "true" color scheme:

public static class ColorScheme
{
    private static CustomColorScheme = new Outlook2007ColorScheme();
    ...
}

private class CustomColorScheme 
{ 
   ...
}

private class Outlook2008ColorScheme : CustomColorScheme 
{
    ...
}

private class Outlook2003ColorScheme : CustomColorScheme 
{
   ...
}

but that would require me to convert a class composed entirly of readonly static Colors into overridable properties, and then my ColorScheme class would need to have the 30 different property getters thunk down into the contained object.

That's just too much typing.

So my next thought was to alias the class:

public static ColorScheme = Outlook2007ColorScheme;

But that doesn't compile.

How can i alias a static class into another name?


Update: Can someone please add the answer "You cannot do this in C#", so i can mark that as the accepted answer. Anyone else wanting the answer to the same question will find this question, the accepted answer, and a number of workarounds that might, or might not, be useful.

i just want to close this question out.

share|improve this question
    
you might as well accept Chris' answer, even if you don't want to implement it –  devio Dec 2 '08 at 14:22
2  
It's not the answer, it's a workaround. The answer is that you cannot - at least until someone comes around and posts the actual syntax to do it. –  Ian Boyd Dec 15 '08 at 16:36

6 Answers 6

If you change the original class name, you could rewrite the dependent code using an import alias as a typedef substitute:

using ColorScheme = The.Fully.Qualified.Namespace.Outlook2007ColorScheme;

This has to go at the top of the file/namespace, just like regular usings.

I don't know if this is practical in your case, though.

share|improve this answer
    
If it could go at the top of the file that contained the original class: it would be great. But the using must be added to to all broken code. And it also negates the value is having a single alias, that lets me switch all users of the existing ColorScheme class to a use a new class - without changes. In other words: i want to alias the ColorScheme class to another class. –  Ian Boyd Oct 5 '11 at 15:45

You want a (Factory|Singleton), depending on your requirements. The premise is to make it so that the client code doesn't have to know which color scheme it is getting. If the color scheme should be application wide, a singleton should be fine. If you may use a different scheme in different circumstances, a Factory pattern is probably the way to go. Either way, when the color scheme needs to change, the code only has to be changed in one place.

public interface ColorScheme {
    Color TitleBar { get; }
    Color Background{ get; }
    ...
}

public static class ColorSchemeFactory {

    private static ColorScheme scheme = new Outlook2007ColorScheme();

    public static ColorScheme GetColorScheme() { //Add applicable arguments
        return scheme;
    }
}

public class Outlook2003ColorScheme: ColorScheme {
   public Color TitleBar {
       get { return Color.LightBlue; }
   }

    public Color Background {
        get { return Color.Gray; }
    }
}

public class Outlook2007ColorScheme: ColorScheme {
   public Color TitleBar {
       get { return Color.Blue; }
   }

    public Color Background {
        get { return Color.White; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like less of a factory and more of a weak attempt at a singleton pattern. A factory would be more likely to parameterize the creation method; you would have something more like: public static ColorScheme GetColorScheme(string descriptor); –  OwenP Oct 28 '08 at 18:33
    
True - the basic idea is to make sure than when office 2012 comes out, the code only has to change in 1 place. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Oct 28 '08 at 18:38
1  
This definetly works, but it certainly is an enterprise-y solution to a simple problem. –  Ian Boyd Nov 5 '08 at 14:59
1  
I would call it good design. –  Chris Marasti-Georg Nov 5 '08 at 18:32
    
Breaks existing code. –  Ian Boyd Oct 5 '11 at 15:42
up vote 7 down vote accepted

You cannot alias a class name in C#.

There are things you can do that are not aliasing a class name in C#.

But to answer the original question: you cannot alias a class name in C#.


Update: People are confused why using doesn't work. Example:

Form1.cs

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   this.BackColor = ColorScheme.ApplyColorScheme(this.BackColor);
}

ColorScheme.cs

class ColorScheme
{
    public static Color ApplyColorScheme(Color c) { ... }
}

And everything works. Now i want to create a new class, and alias ColorScheme to it (so that no code needs to be modified):

ColorScheme.cs

using ColorScheme = Outlook2007ColorScheme;

class Outlook2007ColorScheme
{
    public static Color ApplyColorScheme(Color c) { ... }
}

Ohh, i'm sorry. This code doesn't compile:

enter image description here

My question was how to alias a class in C#. It cannot be done. There are things i can do that are not aliasing a class name in C#:

  • change everyone who depends on ColorScheme to using ColorScheme instead (code change workaround because i cannot alias)
  • change everyone who depends on ColorScheme to use a factory pattern them a polymorphic class or interface (code change workaround because i cannot alias)

But these workarounds involve breaking existing code: not an option.

If people depend on the presence of a ColorScheme class, i have to actually copy/paste a ColorScheme class.

In other words: i cannot alias a class name in C#.

This contrasts with other object oriented languages, where i could define the alias:

ColorScheme = Outlook2007ColorScheme

and i'd be done.

share|improve this answer
7  
You absolutely can alias a class name in C#. "using <alias_name> = <fully_qualified_name>;" –  clemahieu Jul 18 '11 at 15:13
4  
LIke @clemahieu said, you absolutely can alias a class name, you just have to use the fully qualified name. Additionally, if your aliasing a generic class, you can have to add the generic class qualifier. For example: using ShortName = MyNamespace.SubNamespace.GenericClass<MyType>; –  Dan Morphis Oct 5 '11 at 4:38
1  
@Dan Morphis, @clemahieu: Problem with that is it doesn't compile, breaking existing code. The reason it doesn't compile is that you can only use the using in the scope that you can use the using. –  Ian Boyd Oct 5 '11 at 15:40
6  
Downvote - you've stated "You cannot alias a class name in C#." You can. What you can't do is alias a class in the way you want to - which is a quite justified requirement, but your statement is incorrect. –  Tom W Oct 26 '11 at 13:51
5  
As several posters have pointed out, having to use the qualified name in no way prohibits aliasing. You can alias the class. You just have to use the fully-qualified name to do so. You might find this inconvenient, but it doesn't make the statement 'You can't alias a class name in C#' true. Perhaps the way that aliasing works in C# is different to what you were expecting. That's fine - if that's the case, state that. But you can alias a class name in C# because the specification states that you can do so, according to the definition that it provides. –  Tom W Oct 31 '11 at 19:44

try this:

using ColorScheme=[fully qualified].Outlook2007ColorScheme
share|improve this answer
    
The name 'ColorScheme' does not exist in the current context –  Ian Boyd Oct 5 '11 at 15:41
    
you need Fully.Qualified.Namespace.Of.ColorScheme –  Jamie Pate Feb 2 '13 at 21:24

You can make an alias for your class by adding this line of code:

using Outlook2007ColorScheme = YourNameSpace.ColorScheme;
share|improve this answer
    
The name 'ColorScheme' does not exist in the current context –  Ian Boyd Oct 5 '11 at 15:41
2  
you need Fully.Qualified.Namespace.Of.ColorScheme –  Jamie Pate Feb 2 '13 at 21:26

Is it possible to change to using an interface?

Perhaps you could create an IColorScheme interface that all of the classes implement?

This would work well with the factory pattern as shown by Chris Marasti-Georg

share|improve this answer
    
It could be, but i'm not going to spend anymore time on it rather than renaming the class that is the "current" color scheme to use. –  Ian Boyd Nov 5 '08 at 14:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.