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I came across the code below but need some help with understanding the code. Assume that the string s has spaces either side.

string trim(string const& s){
   auto front = find_if_not(begin(s), end(s), isspace);
   auto back = find_if_not(rbegin(s), rend(s), isspace);
   return string { front, back.base() };
}

The author stated that back points to the end of the last space whereas the front points to the first non-white space character. So back.base() was called but I don't understand why.

Also what do the curly braces, following string in the return statement, represent?

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4  
Short of profiling the whole thing, this actually looks like a neat piece of code. –  Niall Jun 26 '14 at 8:02
8  
This code will crash on inputs consisting of only one or more whitespace characters, because the iterators will cross. –  j_random_hacker Jun 26 '14 at 8:51
    
@j_random_hacker I concur. it needs a safety valve to ensure back.base() is greater than front, otherwise just return empty-string. I still like the idea in principal. I think it will actually throw an length exception because the result of last - first will be negative. –  WhozCraig Jun 26 '14 at 8:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

The braces are the new C++11 initialisation.

.base() and reverse iterators

The .base() is to get back the the underlying iterator (back is a reverse_iterator), to properly construct the new string from a valid range.

A picture. Normal iterator positions of a string (it is a little more complex than this regarding how rend() works, but conceptually anyway...)

        begin                                 end
          v                                    v
        -------------------------------------
        | sp | sp | A | B | C | D | sp | sp |
        -------------------------------------
      ^                                   ^
    rend                                rbegin

Once your two find loops finish, the result of those iterators in this sequence will be positioned at:

                  front
                    v
        -------------------------------------
        | sp | sp | A | B | C | D | sp | sp |
        -------------------------------------
                                ^
                              back

Were we to take just those iterators and construct a sequence from them (which we can't, as they're not matching types, but regardless, supposed we could), the result would be "copy starting at A, stopping at D" but it would not include D in the resulting data.

Enter the back() member of a reverse iterator. It returns a non-reverse iterator of the forward iterator class, that is positioned at the element "next to" the back iterator; i.e.

                  front
                    v
        -------------------------------------
        | sp | sp | A | B | C | D | sp | sp |
        -------------------------------------
                                    ^
                               back.base()

Now when we copy our range { front, back.base() } we copy starting at A and stopping at the first space (but not including it), thereby including the D we would have missed.

Its actually a slick little piece of code, btw.

Some additional checking

Added some basic checks to the original code.

In trying to keeping with the spirit of the original code (C++1y/C++14 usage), adding some basic checks for empty and white space only strings;

string trim_check(string const& s)
{
  auto is_space = [](char c) { return isspace(c, locale()); };
  auto front = find_if_not(begin(s), end(s), is_space);
  auto back = find_if_not(rbegin(s), make_reverse_iterator(front), is_space);
  return string { front, back.base() };
}
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2  
It is worth noting the base() iterator references the element next to that referenced by the reverse iterator. In this case, somewhat synonymous to std::next(back), but not in the reverse direction, rather in the "forward" direction of the underlying sequence. –  WhozCraig Jun 26 '14 at 7:58
2  
@WhozCraig Yes. As an additional reference en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/iterator/reverse_iterator contains a nice write up on the reverse_iterator. –  Niall Jun 26 '14 at 8:01
1  
@Smithy back does reference the last none-whitespace character. But if you include that as the end iterator of a copy (or in your case, an iterator-range constructor) that is the stopping position and you're one slot short (and its the wrong type iterator anyway). You don't want to stop there, you want to stop one "slot" after that position. Think of it similar to how end() in a normal iterator sequences references "one-past" the last element. Remember, in C++ iterator end points mean stop when you "get here", not stop once you "pass here". I hope that made sense. –  WhozCraig Jun 26 '14 at 8:07
1  
My ascii-art is pretty lame, but I hope that brings a picture to to this answer (=1 btw). –  WhozCraig Jun 26 '14 at 8:25
1  
@niall ah, no make_reverse_iterator. I am dissappoint. –  Yakk Aug 7 '14 at 11:01

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