Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

OS: Linux. (CentOS 6)
Step 1: login as normal user and change the directory to the home directory
Step 2: su as root
Step 3: create a file and change permission to 0666
Step 4: change file ownership as normal user but failed

[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ pwd   
/home/belcon  
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ su  
Password:   
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# touch test.txt  
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# echo "test">test.txt  
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# cat test.txt  
test  
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# chmod 666 test.txt  
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# ls -l test.txt  
-rw-rw-rw- 1 root root 5 Jun 26 17:50 test.txt  
[root@no1ca4sh belcon]# exit  
exit  
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ ls -l test.txt  
-rw-rw-rw- 1 root root 5 Jun 26 17:50 test.txt  
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ chown belcon test.txt  
chown: changing ownership of `test.txt': Operation not permitted  

That doesn't make sense since I can copy that file to another temporary file as normal user. That temporary file's owner is normal user. Then I can delete the original file, and make a copy the temporary file with same name as original file created by root user. It is actually what 'chown' want to do.

[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ cp test.txt test1.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ ls -l test.txt test1.txt  
-rw-r--r-- 1 belcon wheel 5 Jun 26 17:56 test1.txt  
-rw-rw-rw- 1 root   root  5 Jun 26 17:50 test.txt 
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ diff -Naur test1.txt test.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ rm test.txt
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ ls -l test.txt test1.txt   
ls: cannot access test.txt: No such file or directory  
-rw-r--r-- 1 belcon wheel 5 Jun 26 17:56 test1.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ cp test1.txt test.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ ls -l test.txt test1.txt  
-rw-r--r-- 1 belcon wheel 5 Jun 26 17:56 test1.txt  
-rw-r--r-- 1 belcon wheel 5 Jun 26 17:57 test.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ diff -Naur test1.txt test.txt   
[belcon@no1ca4sh ~]$ 

Can anyone please to explain why I couldn't change ownership of a file with permission 0666? Does there exist some reasons for that?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Ordinary users can't chown files.

See: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/27350/why-cant-a-normal-user-chown-a-file

Basically, it would allow users to evade quotas, and there are other edge cases where security can be compromised. (e.g. applications assuming root-owned files are secure, because only root could have written them).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.