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So I have two lists of data, looking like this (shortened):

[[1.0, 1403603100],
 [0.0, 1403603400],
 [2.0, 1403603700],
 [0.0, 1403604000],
 [None, 1403604300]]

[1.0, 1403603100],
[0.0, 1403603400],
[1.0, 1403603700],
[None, 1403604000],
[5.0, 1403604300]]

What I'm wanting to do is merge them, summing the first elements of each dataset, or making it 0.0 if either counter value is None. So the above example would become this:

[[2.0, 1403603100],
[0.0, 1403603400],
[3.0, 1403603700],
[0.0, 1403604000],
[0.0, 1403604300]]

This is what I've come up with so far, apologies if it's a bit cludgy.

def emit_datum(datapoints):
    for datum in datapoints:
        yield datum

def merge_data(data_set1, data_set2):

    assert len(data_set1) == len(data_set2)
    data_length = len(data_set1)

    data_gen1 = emit_datum(data_set1)
    data_gen2 = emit_datum(data_set2)

    merged_data = []

    for _ in range(data_length):

        datum1 = data_gen1.next()
        datum2 = data_gen2.next()

        if datum1[0] is None or datum2[0] is None:
            merged_data.append([0.0, datum1[1]])
            continue

        count = datum1[0] + datum2[0]
        merged_data.append([count, datum1[1]])

    return merged_data

I can only hope/assume that there's something cunning I can do with itertools or collections?

share|improve this question
    
can you post two datasets separately to just copy and paste them easily – Moj Jun 26 '14 at 10:31
    
Use iter instead of emit_datum – Niklas B. Jun 26 '14 at 10:32
    
made it easier to copy/paste the data – Strings Jun 26 '14 at 10:35
    
In your example, the right hand column is always in the same order, is that something we can assume true? – Jblasco Jun 26 '14 at 10:58
    
Yeh, they are timestamps actually. – Strings Jun 26 '14 at 11:02
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are making both values equal to 0.0 if either are None you just need a simple loop.

 l1 = [1.0, 1403603100],
 [0.0, 1403603400],
 [2.0, 1403603700],
 [0.0, 1403604000],
 [None, 1403604300]]

l2 = [[1.0, 1403603100],
[0.0, 1403603400],
[1.0, 1403603700],
[None, 1403604000],
[5.0, 1403604300]]

final = []
assert len(l1)== len(l2)
for x, y in zip(l1, l2):
    if x[0] is  None or y[0] is  None:
        y[0] = 0.0
        final.append(y)
    else:
        final.append([x[0] + y[0], x[-1]])
print final

[[2.0, 1403603100], [0.0, 1403603400], [3.0, 1403603700], [0.0, 1403604000], [0.0, 1403604300]]


In [51]: %timeit merge_data(l1,l2)
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.76 µs per loop


 In [52]: %%timeit                 
   ....: final = []
   ....: assert len(l1)==len(l2)
   ....: for x, y in zip(l1, l2):
   ....:     if x[0] is  None or y[0] is None:
   ....:         y[0] = 0.0
   ....:         final.append(y)
   ....:     else:
   ....:         final.append([x[0] + y[0], x[-1]])
   ....: 
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.64 µs per loop
share|improve this answer
    
The numpy solution is probably faster, but this is the fastest and simplest so far. Cheers! – Strings Jun 26 '14 at 11:07
    
No worries, I made an edit, I changed to if x[0] is None or y[0] is None – Padraic Cunningham Jun 26 '14 at 11:16

What about 'binning' the data based on the identifier, i.e. collecting all values corresponding to one identifier (e.g. 1403603400), and later sum it up. A dictionary is great for collecting all values corresponding to an identifier (key), and a defaultdict of type list makes this especially simple:

>>> data = [[1.0, 1403603100],  [1.0, 1403603100],
...  [0.0, 1403603400],  [0.0, 1403603400],
...  [2.0, 1403603700],  [1.0, 1403603700],
...  [0.0, 1403604000],  [None, 1403604000],
...  [None, 1403604300],  [5.0, 1403604300]]

>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> d = defaultdict(list)
>>> for value, identifier in data:
...     d[identifier].append(value)
... 

Now we have the data sorted and can conditionally sum it:

>>> for identifier, valuelist in d.iteritems():
...     if not None in valuelist:
...         print identifier, sum(valuelist)
...     else:
...         print identifier, 0.0
... 
1403603400 0.0
1403603700 3.0
1403603100 2.0
1403604300 0.0
1403604000 0.0

The last part in short, to obtain the list that you wanted to:

>>> [[i, sum(v)] if None not in v else [i, .0] for i, v in d.iteritems()]
[[1403603400, 0.0], [1403603700, 3.0], [1403603100, 2.0], [1403604300, 0.0], [1403604000, 0.0]]

That approach requires the data sets to be mixed in the first place, as you had in the first version of your example input.

share|improve this answer
    
The two datasets each have a list of their own, not sure how I'd re-factor your solution to take that into account. – Strings Jun 26 '14 at 10:40
1  
.extend() one list with the other, to make them one. (you had it different in your first version, I just copied your code, now it changed). – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jun 26 '14 at 10:41
    
Apart from that, you need to better specify how the merge should happen. In my solution, it does not matter if there is a matching between the one and the other data set. Do you want to merge only matches and omit those data points that are only contained in one of the lists? If yes, then my solution as it is right now does not work. If not, then the distinction into multiple data sets is not required, you only have one big collection of data points. – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jun 26 '14 at 10:43

use numpy array and you don't need to do any looping.this make your code faster if you are dealing with larger datasets.

import numpy as np

In [68]: a = np.asarray(a)


In [69]: b = np.asarray(b)

In [71]: a_none_idx = np.equal(a,None)

In [72]: b_none_idx = np.equal(b,None)

In [73]: a[a_none_idx]=0

In [74]: b[b_none_idx]=0

In [76]: c = np.zeros(a.shape)

In [77]: c[:,0]= a[:,0] + b[:,0]

In [78]: c
Out[78]: 
array([[ 2.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.],
       [ 3.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.],
       [ 5.,  0.]])

In [79]: c[a_none_idx]=0

In [80]: c[b_none_idx]=0

In [81]: c[:,1] = a[:,1]

In [82]: c
Out[82]: 
array([[  2.00000000e+00,   1.40360310e+09],
       [  0.00000000e+00,   1.40360340e+09],
       [  3.00000000e+00,   1.40360370e+09],
       [  0.00000000e+00,   1.40360400e+09],
       [  0.00000000e+00,   1.40360430e+09]]
share|improve this answer
    
You should mention that np is numpy. Many know, but not everybody knows :) – Jan-Philip Gehrcke Jun 26 '14 at 10:46
    
@Jan-PhilipGehrcke you are right. fixed it – Moj Jun 26 '14 at 10:47

You can make use of zip, like so:

def merge(list1, list2):
    returnlist = []
    for x, y in zip(list1, list2):
        if x[0] is None or y[0] is None:
            returnlist.append([0.0, x[1]])
        else:
            returnlist.append([x[0] + y[0], x[1]])

    return returnlist

zip returns an iterator over tuples containing elements from each input list with the same index (i.e. (list1[0], list2[0]), (list1[1], list2[1]), etc.)

share|improve this answer

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