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Input file1

BRAF      p.Gly464Val  Non-small cell p.Gly464Val   pathogenic
BAG3      p.His83Gln  AllHighlyPenetrant      p.His83Gln     pathogenic 
EYA4      p.Gly277Ser  AllHighlyPenetrant     p.Gly277Ser    pathogenic

myCmd

egrep "p\.[A-Z][a-z]{1,}[0-9]{1,}[A-Z][a-z]{1,}" file1

Expected output

BRAF      p.Gly464Val  Non-small cell  pathogenic
BAG3      p.His83Gln  AllHighlyPenetrant  pathogenic 
EYA4      p.Gly277Ser  AllHighlyPenetrant  pathogenic 

How can i remove the second grep match? Any suggestion will be appreciated.
thnx

share|improve this question
    
i dont know how to use that..I am a newbie.Can you please demonstrate? – diablo8226 Jun 26 '14 at 16:00
1  
it's unclear. Does the input contains on;ly three lines? – Avinash Raj Jun 26 '14 at 16:04
    
Is second grep match always second last field? – Jotne Jun 26 '14 at 16:54
    
@AvinashRaj : no there are 10k similar entries – diablo8226 Jun 26 '14 at 19:02
    
@Jotne : yes it is always second last – diablo8226 Jun 26 '14 at 19:05

If formatting is not important:

awk '{$(NF-1)=""}1' file
BRAF p.Gly464Val Non-small cell  pathogenic
BAG3 p.His83Gln AllHighlyPenetrant  pathogenic
EYA4 p.Gly277Ser AllHighlyPenetrant  pathogenic
share|improve this answer

Assuming that the repeated text always first appears as the second field:

$ cat input.txt
BRAF      p.Gly464Val  Non-small cell p.Gly464Val   pathogenic
BAG3      p.His83Gln  AllHighlyPenetrant      p.His83Gln     pathogenic
EYA4      p.Gly277Ser  AllHighlyPenetrant     p.Gly277Ser    pathogenic

$ sed -r 's/^([^ ]* *)([^ ]*)(.*)(\2 *)(.*)/\1\2\3\5/' input.txt
BRAF      p.Gly464Val  Non-small cell pathogenic
BAG3      p.His83Gln  AllHighlyPenetrant      pathogenic
EYA4      p.Gly277Ser  AllHighlyPenetrant     pathogenic

Explanation:

  1. The first bracket matches first field & spaces after that.
  2. Second bracket matches second field.
  3. Third bracket matches any text till the 2nd field is found again.
  4. Then match the repeated 2nd field & any spaces after that.
  5. Match anything remaining in last bracket.
  6. Finally, replace it with everything except repeated 2nd field.
share|improve this answer
1  
+2 for the explanation – diablo8226 Jun 26 '14 at 19:04

The following command should do the job regardless of the format.

perl -pe 's/(p\.[A-Z][a-z]{1,}[0-9]{1,}[A-Z][a-z]{1,}.*?)p\.[A-Z][a-z]{1,}[0-9]{1,}[A-Z][a-z]{1,}/\1/' file

perl -pe 's/<regex>/<substitution>/' file will replace all occurrences of <regex> with <substitution>.

So to break the regex down:

(p\.[A-Z][a-z]{1,}[0-9]{1,}[A-Z][a-z]{1,}.*?) capture your pattern and anything after until it reaches the next condition. The ? after the * is to make it non greedy, since you want it to stop the second time it the pattern matches. If you don't put the ? and you have a third match, or more matches after, then it would remove the last match it found, since * would capture everything it can.

p\.[A-Z][a-z]{1,}[0-9]{1,}[A-Z][a-z]{1,} The second time we use your pattern. This time we don't capture it (no ()), since we want to discard it anyways.

Anything following this pattern won't be matched and so it won't be affected. We then substitute \1, which is the first captured group, for the matched section, therefore "forgetting" the second match.

Why perl over grep

Grep is designed around search, so it will be easy to find patterns, but not so easy to format the output.

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