Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The copy-and-swap idiom is said to provide a strong exception guarantee. But in C++11, std::swap uses move operations.

Consider the following code:

class MyClass
{
    AClass x;
    CanThrowIfMoved throwingObject;

    MyClass(MyClass&& other) noexcept
        x(std::move(other.x)),
        throwingObject(std::move(other.throwingObject))
    { }

    friend void swap(MyClass& first, MyClass& second) noexcept
    {
        using std::swap;
        swap(first.x, other.x);
        swap(first.throwingObject, other.throwingObject);
    }

    MyClass& operator=(MyClass other) noexcept
    {
        swap(*this, other);
        return *this;
    }
};

If throwingObject throws during the swap, the strong exception guarantee is broken.

The noexcept keywords don't enforce anything during compile time. throwingObject can still throw, the only difference is that the program will violently terminate. I don't think crashing the entire application when an exception occurs counts as a strong exception guarantee.

Does this mean that copy-and-swap no longer enforces the strong exception guarantee in C++11?


Similar questions

This question is similar, but it's targeted at using the standard library. I'm interested in what this issue means for the strong exception guarantee of the copy-and-swap idiom.

This question discusses how to use noexcept in the copy-and-swap idiom, but only discusses the copy. Not the swap, which is where the problem seems to be.

share|improve this question
4  
The main prerequisite of copy-swap is a non-throwing swap function, so your problem is not with copy-swap. –  chris Jun 26 '14 at 19:05
    
@chris The main sentiment behind this question is whether it is even possible to provide a non-throwing swap function, considering you rely on the move constructors of other classes (whose definitions may change in the future). –  Aberrant Jun 26 '14 at 19:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of directly invoking swap in the swap member method, use a helper function template, that checks at compile time the noexcept guarantee:

friend void swap(MyClass& first, MyClass& second) noexcept
{
    util::swap_noexcept(first.x, other.x);
    util::swap_noexcept(first.throwingObject, other.throwingObject);
}

namespace util
{
    template <typename ...Args>
    void swap_noexcept(Args&&... args) noexcept
    {
        using std::swap;
        static_assert(noexcept(swap(std::forward<Args>(args)...)), "requires noexcept");
        swap(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like this would work. Does this mean these static assertions should really be used in every swap function? The types and class definitions of the members could always change to remove their noexcept so it doesn't seem safe to manually check for those and expect them to stay that way. –  Aberrant Jun 26 '14 at 19:22
    
@Aberrant: The helper function swap_noexcept has to be written only once, and so the static_assert. If the noexcept is removed from a swap function, it's good that the compilation fails, because otherwise your code will break at runtime. –  nosid Jun 26 '14 at 19:32
    
Sorry, I think I phrased that wrong. My question is, am I right to think that you must always use these static asserts in some way to really be able to give the strong guarentee? –  Aberrant Jun 26 '14 at 19:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.