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So its time for me to index my database file format and after looking at various methods, I decided that a hash table would be my best option. Since I've only familiarized myself with the inner workings of a hash table just today though, heres my understanding of it so please correct me if I'm wrong:

A hash table has a constant size that is equivalent of the maximum value storable in its hash function output size * key value pair size * bucket size + overflow bucket size. So for example, if the hash function makes 16 bit hashes and the bucket size is 4 and the values are 32bit then it would be 2^16 * 4 * 6 = 1572864 or 1.5MB plus overflow.

That in essence would make the hash table a sort of compressed lookup table. If the hash function changes, the whole table has to be reevaluated. Otherwise it just adds stuff to empty slots. Also the hash table can contain the maximum of units that its hash size could address (so for a 16bit hash its 65536) but to perform well without many collisions it would have to be much less.

Ok and heres the things I'm trying to index: (up to) 100 million pairs with 64bit integer keys and a 96bit value. The keys are object ID's(that mostly come in short sequences but can be all over the place) and the values are the object location + length. Reads/writes are equally important and very frequent.

The other options i looked into were various trees but the reason I didn't like them is because it seems to me that i would have to do a lot of sparse reads/writes to look up the data or to restructure the tree each time I go in.

So here are my questions:

  1. It seems to me that I need a hash with a weird number of bits in it, I'm thinking up to ~38 since it would be just about the maximum I can store on a single disk and should be comfy enough for the 100 million. Is the weird bit amount unheard of? I'm thinking I'll probably bottleneck on disk activity way before CPU.
  2. Are there any articles out there on how to design a good hash function for my particular case? Googling gave me an overview of the common methods but I'm looking for explanations behind them.
  3. Any other general tips/pitfalls I should know of?
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1 Answer 1

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A hash table has a constant size

...not necessarily - a hash table can support resizing, but that tends to be done in fairly dramatic and invasive chunks where you can reason about the hash table as if it were constant size both before and after.

...that is equivalent of the maximum value storable in its hash function output size * key value pair size * bucket size + overflow bucket size. So for example, if the hash function makes 16 bit hashes and the bucket size is 4 and the values are 32bit then it would be 2^16 * 4 * 6 = 1572864 or 1.5MB plus overflow.

Not at all. A better way to calculate size is to say there are N values of a certain size, and you want to maintain a capacity:size ratio somewhere between say 3:1 and 5:4: the table memory usage is: N * sizeof(Value) * ratio.

The number of bits in the hash value is only relevant in that it indicates the maximum number of distinct buckets you can hash to: if you try to have a bigger table then you'll get more collisions than you would with a hash function generating wider-bit hash values. If you have more bits from your hash function than you need it is not a problem, you e.g. take the modulus with the current table size to find your bucket: hashed_to_bucket = hash_value % num_buckets.

That in essence would make the hash table a sort of compressed lookup table.

That's a good way to look at a hash table.

If the hash function changes, the whole table has to be reevaluated. Otherwise it just adds stuff to empty slots.

Definitely reevaluated/regenerated. Otherwise adding to empty slots is but one of the undesirable consequences.

Also the hash table can contain the maximum of units that its hash size could address (so for a 16bit hash its 65536) but to perform well without many collisions it would have to be much less.

As above, that (e.g. 65536) is not a hard maximum, but "to perform well without collisions" going over that should be avoided. To perform well it does not have to be much less: anything right up to 65536 is perfectly fine if it's a good quality 16-bit hash function.

Ok and heres the things I'm trying to index: (up to) 100 million pairs with 64bit integer keys and a 96bit value. The keys are object ID's(that mostly come in short sequences but can be all over the place) and the values are the object location + length. Reads/writes are equally important and very frequent.

The other options i looked into were various trees but the reason I didn't like them is because it seems to me that i would have to do a lot of sparse reads/writes to look up the data or to restructure the tree each time I go in.

Could be... a lot depends on your access patterns. For example, if you happen to try to access the keys following the "short sequences" then a data organisation model that tends to put them nearby in memory/disk helps. Some types of tree structures do that nicely, and you can sometimes hack your hash function to do it too (but need to balance that up against collision proneness).

It seems to me that I need a hash with a weird number of bits in it, I'm thinking up to ~38 since it would be just about the maximum I can store on a single disk and should be comfy enough for the 100 million. Is the weird bit amount unheard of? I'm thinking I'll probably bottleneck on disk activity way before CPU.

Not so... you have 64 bit integer keys - a 64 bit or larger hash would be desirable. That said, a 32 bit hash may well be fine too - that generates 4 billion distinct values which is greater than your 100 million keys.

Are there any articles out there on how to design a good hash function for my particular case? Googling gave me an overview of the common methods but I'm looking for explanations behind them.

Not that I'm aware of.

Any other general tips/pitfalls I should know of?

For tips... I'd say start simple (e.g. with the hash function returning the key unchanged and using modulus with a hash table capacity that's a prime number, OR using any common hash if you're picking up a hash table implementation that uses e.g. power-of-2 numbers of buckets) and measure your collision rates: that tells you how much effort it's worth putting into improving your hashing.

One very simple way to get "ideal, randomised" hashing in your case is to have 8 tables of 256 32-bit integers - initialised with hardcoded random numbers (you can google for random number download websites). Given any 64-bit key, just slice it into 8 bytes then use each byte as a key in the successive tables, XORing the 32-bit values you look up. A single bit of difference in any of the 64 input bits will then impact all 32 bits in the hash value with equal probability.

uint32_t table[8][256] = { ...add some random numbers... };

uint32_t h(uint64_t n)
{
    uint32_t result = 0;
    unsigned char* p = (unsigned char*)&n;

    for (int i = 0; i < 8; ++i)
        result ^= table[i][*p++];

    return result;
}
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Thanks that gives me a better overview of the concept. "with the hash function returning the key unchanged and using modulus with a hash table capacity that's a prime number" I was actually doing that for my "StupidDictionary" test class and it yielded awful dispersion which is why i was under the impression that you'd need a much bigger table per data to perform well :p I just tried murmurhash2_64 though and its way awesome. –  Jake Freelander Jun 27 '14 at 19:12
    
@KarliRaudsepp: awful dispersion yes, but that's actually good for you because you've got more data clumped on fewer disk pages which means better average I/O speeds. The important thing is whether it has lots of collisions, and it shouldn't. A stronger hash like murmur or the code in my answer will give you terrific dispersion, but your application may perform worse due to increased page faults (both due to less grouping of data, and that similar inputs have no statistical likelihood of being on the same disk page). (This is what I alluded to with "hack your hash" in the answer.) –  Tony D Jun 28 '14 at 5:54

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