Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a hash function that returns a 16-digit hex value (as MD5 returns 32-digit), or is there a library (for C++) in which I can use MD5 or SHA-1 which returns a 16-digit value

share|improve this question
    
In your earlier question, you mentioned that you wanted to store the hash value in 16 chars rather than a 16-digit hex value. 16 chars is 128 bits which is the same number of bits as hash values created with MD5 so if you are actually using chars you should be able to fit the whole MD5 hash value into your them. –  Justin Peel Mar 15 '10 at 0:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Since you're willing to live with the much-higher collision rate, you can just truncate the MD5 hash of the data.

share|improve this answer
    
wouldnt this give a higher collision rate than having a hash that returns 16^16 unique strings –  Aly Mar 15 '10 at 0:01
    
Marginally. It's about 1 in 30.6e12 chance of a collision either way, which is not all that impressive. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Mar 15 '10 at 0:05

is there a library (for C++) in which I can use MD5 or SHA-1 which returns a 16-digit value

Lookup the OpenSSL crypto library (free) or RSA BSAFE (paid).

share|improve this answer
    
could you provide an example of how to truncate the hash from 32-digits to 16 using the crypto library –  Aly Mar 15 '10 at 0:00

If you truncate the size of a cryptographic hash function, you will break it - by which I mean you're very likely to damage the properties which make it cryptographically secure. If the cryptographic properties aren't important to you, then you don't need a cryptographic hash at all - you'd be better off with a checksum or non-cryptographic hash.

And whatever you're doing, don't use md5. If you need a cryptographic hash function, md5 isn't a good choice as algorithms exist that create collisions in a reasonable amount of time. If you don't need a cryptographic hash function, then md5 is overkill.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.