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How do I make a tree of all things with bash? What is the command?

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1  
All things? It can be really hard. tree can be used for file system and pstree for processes. Possibly there are other *tree tools. Google can be invaluable here. – przemoc Mar 15 '10 at 0:24
tree /

or

find / 

Update: @OP, since you have so much trouble with it, how about this alternative. On ubuntu 9.10, you should have bash 4.0 ? so try this

#!/bin/bash
shopt -s globstar
for rdir in /*/
do
    for file in $rdir/**
    do
      echo "$file"
    done
done
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none of them work...i'm using virtual machine, could be that? tree / says that is not installed – pedro Mar 15 '10 at 0:22
2  
If tree isn't installed on your Ubuntu machine use: sudo aptitude install tree – Benoit Mar 15 '10 at 0:23
    
you don't even have find?? – ghostdog74 Mar 15 '10 at 0:26
    
the same...0 packages installed :S – pedro Mar 15 '10 at 0:26
1  
The tree package (packages.ubuntu.com/karmic/tree) is part of the universe packages, which might not be enabled. I would ask this question on the Ubuntu forums as it's not strictly programming related and they would likely already have resources to point you towards to help you out. – Benoit Mar 15 '10 at 0:43

tree -R /

and then cry because it's enormous.

On a related note, to stop the command, press CTRL+C

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says that tree is not installed – pedro Mar 15 '10 at 0:24
    
Like I commented to ghostdog74's answer, install it with this command: sudo aptitude install tree – Benoit Mar 15 '10 at 0:26
    
i already try to install...after i write tree and says is not installed – pedro Mar 15 '10 at 0:29

you should probably alias this :)

ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e 's/:$//' -e 's/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g' -e 's/^/ /' -e 's/-/|/'

(Warning: huge output)

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Assuming you want to find something from tree, do

    tree / > tree.txt

Then Ctrl + F it.

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