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I have an unordered map string to int which uses a custom equal_to function defined as:

bool hashEqual::operator ()(const string &a, const string &b) const
{
    if (a.size() != b.size())
        return false;

    return std::inner_product(
        a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(),
        0, std::plus<unsigned int>(),
        std::not2(std::equal_to<std::string::value_type>())
        ) <= 8;  
}           

Basically what it does is if two keys have a hamming distance equal or less than 8, then is the same key.

The thing is I want the distance threshold to be dynamic in order to let the user set it through the command line. Instead of 8, a variable threshold or something like this.

I'm not looking for a hack like a global variable (unless it's the only way to achieve this) but for the "good way".

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Does your operation actually define an equivalence relation?! –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '14 at 9:13
    
Yes it returns true if the distance between a and b is less than 8 –  Jcao02 Jun 27 '14 at 9:15
    
So it's like E is equal to D and F, but not to Z... but F is equal to G, and G to H, ... and Y to Z... so is this transitive? –  Kerrek SB Jun 27 '14 at 9:16
1  
Such an equality function is not suitable for use with a hash table such as unordered_map. Say you have one key/value in the hash table, then you try to find another key, there's a chance they'll "collide" to the same bucket - if they compare equal despite being different then your comparison will say it's found a match, and you may be able to modify the original value (e.g. sum the individual values). But, the hash of the second value is more likely to map to a distinct bucket, such that no equivalence test is ever attempted. There are many such issues - too many to list quickly. –  Tony D Jun 27 '14 at 12:06
1  
@Jcao02: yes, it fails for counting, and so can multimap - most often when the first character is very different, even if the rest is identical - then there's only a small chance of a coincidental comparison as it compares to nodes near the root to work out which part of the tree to branch towards. Try say "A123456" and "z123456" in a few different sets of ~10 keys - you should find it only works a few times at best. Sadly, I don't think there's any simple and correct way to do the comparisons other than brute force (try every combination). And results vary for same data in another order. –  Tony D Jun 28 '14 at 5:37

2 Answers 2

Why `unordered_map` doesn't work reliably

A good general-purpose hash function maps keys to buckets in a repeatable but otherwise seemingly random way, by which I mean that if the key varies by even a single bit then the bucket should be statistically unrelated - as if you'd picked another at random. So, say you have a hash table with some existing elements:

[ bucket 0 - "abcde fghij" ]
[ bucket 1 - <empty> ]
[ bucket 2 - <empty> ]
[ bucket 3 - "01234 56789", "77777 QQQQQ" ]  (2 colliding values for this bucket)
[ bucket 4 - "XXXXX YYYYY" ]
[ bucket 5 - <empty> ]

If you come along to insert say "Abcde fghij" then you could hash to any of these buckets - you should have no more chance of that being bucket 0 than any of the others, but if that bucket is not bucket 0 then you'll never even attempt a hamming-distance-aware equality comparison against "abcde fghij".


Why `multimap` doesn't work reliably

Imagine we a multimap with some existing strings (S1 through S6 in increasing lexicographical sort order - each with a hamming distance of more than 8 from the other elements) in it, the actual balanced binary tree might look something vaguely like:

            S4
          /    \
        S2       S6
       /  \     /  \
      S1   S3  S5

Now, let's say S1 happens to be "Abcde fghij", S4 is "ZZZZZ ZZZZZ" and we go to insert "abcde fghij":

  • even with hamming distance comparison, "ZZZZZ ZZZZZ" < "abcde fghij" (remember that 'Z' < 'a' in ASCII order) so the multimap expects "abcde fghij" to be stored in the right hand side of the tree...

  • "abcde fghij" is then compared to S6, and if less S5, and will be inserted accordingly, but crucially there's never any comparison with S1


Which brings me back to my earlier comment:

I don't think there's any simple and correct way to do the comparisons other than brute force (try every combination). And results vary for same data in another order.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I figured it out.

All is done in the class hashEqual. I changed the definition like this:

class hashEqual {
    private:
        int th;
    public:
       hashEqual();
        hashEqual(int th) { this->th = th; }; // This implemetation on the .cpp
        bool operator ()(const string &a, const string &b) const;
};

the operator() implementation:

bool hashEqual::operator ()(const string &a, const string &b) const
{
    if (a.size() != b.size())
        return false;

    return std::inner_product(
        a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(),
        0, std::plus<unsigned int>(),
        std::not2(std::equal_to<std::string::value_type>())
        ) <= this->th;  
}   

And in the constructor of the unordered_map:

boost::unordered_map<string, unsigned int, boost::hash<string>, hashEqual> myMap(size, boost::hash<string>(), hashEqual(threshold));
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