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I have implemented multithreaded code in two ways, but in both ways I got an error. Could someone explain what causes the problem?

In version 1, I got an exception saying two arguments passed to writekey function instead of one. In version 2, one of the threads reads empty line, therefore exception is raised while processing the empty string.

I am using locks, shouldn't it prevent multiple threads accessing the function or file at the same time?

Version 1:

class SomeThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, somequeue, lockfile):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.myqueue = somequeue
        self.myfilelock = lockfile

    def writekey(key):
        if os.path.exists(os.path.join('.', outfile)):
            with open(outfile, 'r') as fc:
                readkey = int(fc.readline().rstrip())
            os.remove(os.path.join('.', outfile))

        with open(outfile, 'w') as fw:
            if readkey > key:
                fw.write(str(readkey))
            else:
                fw.write(str(key))

    def run(self):
        while(True):
            dict = self.myqueue.get()

            self.myfilelock.acquire()
            try:
                self.writekey(dict.get("key"))
            finally:
                self.myfilelock.release()

            self.myqueue.task_done()

populateQueue() # populate queue with objects    
filelock = threading.Lock()

for i in range(threadnum):
    thread = SomeThread(somequeue, filelock)
    thread.setDaemon(True)
    thread.start()

somequeue.join()

Version 2:

def writekey(key):
    if os.path.exists(os.path.join('.', outfile)):
        with open(outfile, 'r') as fc:
            # do something...

        os.remove(os.path.join('.', outfile))

    with open(outfile, 'w') as fw:
        # do something...

class SomeThread(threading.Thread):
    def __init__(self, somequeue, lockfile):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.myqueue = somequeue
        self.myfilelock = lockfile

    def run(self):
        while(True):
            dict = self.myqueue.get()

            self.myfilelock.acquire()
            try:
                writekey(dict.get("key"))
            finally:
                myfilelock.release()

            self.myqueue.task_done()

# Same as above ....
share|improve this question
    
It would be helpful if you could post the exceptions. –  mhawke Jun 27 at 11:40
    
Exception in thread Thread-2: Traceback (most recent call last): ....in run self.writekey(dict.get("key")) File ..., in writekey readkey = int(fc.readline().rstrip()) ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '' –  Yakup Jun 27 at 13:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In version 1, def writekey(key) should be declared with "self" as the first parameter, i.e.

def writekey(self, key):

The problem in version 2 is less clear. I assume that an empty line is being read while reading outfile. This is normal and it indicates that the end-of-file has been reached. Normally you would just break out of your read loop. Usually it is preferable to read your file line-by-line in a for loop, e.g.

with open(outfile, 'r') as fc:
    for line in fc:
        # process the line

The for loop will terminate naturally upon reaching end-of-file.

share|improve this answer
    
Tried it that way. Got the same error with the version 2. I was reading from file and converting it to integer (int(fc.readline().rstrip())) in writekey() function. Exception is: Exception in thread Thread-4, ValueError: invalid literal for int() with base 10: '' –  Yakup Jun 27 at 11:58
    
Exception is raised because line read is empty. However it should be written before in writekey() function. –  Yakup Jun 27 at 12:03
    
Actually, outfile has only one line, storing the key. After the outfile is opened, the previous key is read and then file is deleted. The key passed as an argument is written afterwards to the newly created outfile. –  Yakup Jun 27 at 12:10
    
int('') raises that exception. Don't process an empty line. Empty line means end-of-file - there is no data for you to process. You don't show that code, so we can't tell what is going on. Also, it's not necessary to delete the file - open(outfile, 'w') will truncate an existing file otherwise it will create it. –  mhawke Jun 27 at 12:29
    
I have editted inside of the writekey() function. When I checked the file, there is nothing inside. There should always be a line with a key. How this can happen? I will try it without deleting the file. –  Yakup Jun 27 at 13:16

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