Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically there is a JPanel on which I want to know when the mouse enters the area of the JPanel and exits the area of the JPanel. So I added a mouse listener, but if there are components on the JPanel and the mouse goes over one of them it is detected as an exit on the JPanel, even though the component is on the JPanel. I was wondering whether anyone knows any way to solve this problem without doing something like adding listeners onto all components on the JPanel?

share|improve this question
    
The answers in this question are applicable to your problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/1882055/… –  Ash Mar 15 '10 at 5:56

4 Answers 4

Here is one way to do it for a component that may contain other components:

  1. Add a global AWT event listener to get all mouse events. For example:

    Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().addAWTEventListener( 
       new TargetedMouseHandler( panel ), AWTEvent.MOUSE_EVENT_MASK );
    
  2. Implement the TargetedMouseHandler to ignore events that aren't sourced by the panel or by one of the panel's children (you can use SwingUtilities.isDescendingFrom to test for this).

  3. Keep track of whether or not the mouse is already within the bounds of your panel. When you get a MouseEvent.MOUSE_ENTERED event in your panel or one of its children, set a flag to true.

  4. When you get a MouseEvent.MOUSE_EXITED event, only reset the flag if the point in the MouseEvent is outside the bounds of your target panel. SwingUtilities.convertPoint and Component.getBounds().contains() will come in handy here.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to implement your idea (to have a global right-click handler (context menu) on a panel with components), but I found out it is really global, ie. at the whole application level, which might be annoying with internal frames as we have, and we must remove the handler when closing the corresponding internal frame. Still an interesting and informative answer, that can be suited to simpler cases. –  PhiLho Jun 7 '11 at 11:17

This is sample code implementing Ash's solution. For me, the JFrame did not detect all exit events properly, but an inner JPanel did, so I passed in two components - one for testing descendants and one for testing the boundary.

Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().addAWTEventListener(
        new TargetedMouseHandler(this, this.jPanel), 
        AWTEvent.MOUSE_EVENT_MASK);
}

public class TargetedMouseHandler implements AWTEventListener
{

    private Component parent;
    private Component innerBound;
    private boolean hasExited = true;

    public TargetedMouseHandler(Component p, Component p2)
    {
        parent = p;
        innerBound = p2;
    }

    @Override
    public void eventDispatched(AWTEvent e)
    {
        if (e instanceof MouseEvent)
        {
            if (SwingUtilities.isDescendingFrom(
                (Component) e.getSource(), parent))
            {
                MouseEvent m = (MouseEvent) e;
                if (m.getID() == MouseEvent.MOUSE_ENTERED)
                {
                    if (hasExited)
                    {
                        System.out.println("Entered");
                        hasExited = false;
                    }
                } else if (m.getID() == MouseEvent.MOUSE_EXITED)
                {
                    Point p = SwingUtilities.convertPoint(
                        (Component) e.getSource(),
                        m.getPoint(),
                        innerBound);
                    if (!innerBound.getBounds().contains(p))
                    {
                        System.out.println("Exited");
                        hasExited = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to get all event send to a top-level window you can add a listener to the glass pane of the JFrame. See: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/docs/api/javax/swing/RootPaneContainer.html#getGlassPane%28%29

share|improve this answer
    
The question was about a JPanel, not the JFrame. You might answer the question, but only partially, so the answer isn't suitable for a newbie. PS.: even back in 2010, I think it is better link to Java 1.6 docs. –  PhiLho Jun 6 '11 at 8:05

There is a very easy solution for this problem that can work :

public class MyJPanel implements MouseListener {

    public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e) {
        java.awt.Point p = new java.awt.Point(e.getLocationOnScreen());
        SwingUtilities.convertPointFromScreen(p, e.getComponent());
        if(e.getComponent().contains(p)) {return;}
        ...//the rest of your code
    }

    ...
}

This way you just ignore the mouseExited event when it occurs on a child element.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.