Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

assume this following function:

int binaryTree::findHeight(node *n) {
    if (n == NULL) {
        return 0;
    } else {
        return 1 + max(findHeight(n->left), findHeight(n->right));
    }
}

Pretty standard recursive treeHeight function for a given binary search tree binaryTree. Now, I was helping a friend (he's taking an algorithms course), and I ran into some weird issue with this function that I couldn't 100% explain to him.

With max being defined as max(a,b) ((a)>(b)?(a):(b)) (which happens to be the max definition in windef.h), the recursive function freaks out (it runs something like n^n times where n is the tree height). This obviously makes checking the height of a tree with 3000 elements take very, very long.

However, if max is defined via templating, like std does it, everything is okay. So using std::max fixed his problem. I just want to know why.

Also, why does the countLeaves function work fine, using the same programmatic recursion?

int binaryTree::countLeaves(node *n) {
    if (n == NULL) {
        return 0;
    } else if (n->left == NULL && n->right == NULL) {
        return 1;
    } else {
        return countLeaves(n->left) + countLeaves(n->right);
    }
}

Is it because in returning the ternary function, the values a => countLeaves(n->left) and b => countLeaves(n->right) were recursively double called simply because they were the resultants?

Thank you!

The question was answered below

I just wanted to link some literature on the subject for future reference:
http://www.boostpro.com/tmpbook/preprocessor.html
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z3f89ch8.aspx

The main difference between the two implementations being:

#define max(i, j) (((i) > (j)) ? (i) : (j))

vs

template<class T> T max (T i, T j) { return ((i > j) ? i : j) }

Thank you all!

share|improve this question
1  
Substitute the max macro with its definition and you'll see why. –  Yngve Hammersland Mar 15 '10 at 6:54
    
Both functions work fine. The only reason the first failed is because it used the max macro. The second doesn't. –  GManNickG Mar 15 '10 at 7:04
    
Macros are evil. Avoid them until you are sure there is no other way (knowing when that is comes easier with experience). –  Roger Pate Mar 15 '10 at 8:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Macros are expanded by the preprocessor, before the compiler gets to see the code. This means that, for example, macro parameters might be evaluated more than once.

With your macro, you're going to end up with something akin to:

int binaryTree::findHeight(node *n) {
    if (n == NULL) {
        return 0;
    } else {
        return 1 + (findHeight(n->left) > findHeight(n->right)) ? // call once...
                    findHeight(n->left) : findHeight(n->right); // and ouch
    }
}

As you can see, it's going to evaluate both functions, then one more an additional time. This is why macros can be evil.

You can disable the macro by defining NOMINMAX prior to including the Windows headers. Then use the function in <algorithm> instead.

If he must use the macro, he'll have to store the calculations in a variable:

int binaryTree::findHeight(node *n) {
    if (n == NULL) {
        return 0;
    } else {
        const int leftHeight = findHeight(n->left);
        const int rightHeight = findHeight(n->right);
        return 1 + max(leftHeight, rightHeight);
    }
}

With a function, each call will be evaluated prior to calling the function. That is, it's somewhat like the previous code block. It evaluates the function's arguments, gets the results, then passes those into the std::max function. There are no repeated evaluations.

share|improve this answer
2  
And damnit. I had this all written up when the power flickered at my house and I lost it all. FUUUU- –  GManNickG Mar 15 '10 at 7:01
    
Thanks I already knew the macro was the issue :P But I just wanted to know why the std implementation works whereas the windef.h one doesn't (how, specifically, they are different programmatically). –  David Titarenco Mar 15 '10 at 7:35
    
@David: I've edited to clarify, let me know if that answers your question. –  GManNickG Mar 15 '10 at 7:37
    
You sort of did (and I accepted). However, I already know the difference between a macro and a function (I'm not a novice programmer ;p), but the STL uses templates which I also thought were expanded by the preprocessor (i.e. some cases of template metaprogramming). –  David Titarenco Mar 15 '10 at 17:33
1  
Templates just make code. A template function is a template for a function, the compiler plugs in the types and gets a function for those types. Nothing special, really. The preprocessor is for text, templates are for code. What would the preprocessor expand? It can't generate the function for some future type. –  GManNickG Mar 15 '10 at 17:38

That max macro evaluates the arguments twice - and since your argument is a recursive function call, that's probably the source of the perf problem.

share|improve this answer

It's because of the definition of max. You're making 3 calls to findHeight() instead of 2.

share|improve this answer

a better option would be to declare a function with following signature:

int max(int, int)

This will prevent the recursive expansion of macro.

share|improve this answer
1  
No need, that function already exists in the form of std::max. –  Roger Pate Mar 15 '10 at 7:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.