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I have a form which has a css button.

I can submit the form if I click submit with my mouse, but how can I get it to submit the form if I hit the 'enter' key on my desktop computer.

If I hit the 'enter' key now nothing happens and the form does not submit.

Thanks

<form action="login.php" id="login" class="iform" method="POST">
   <input type="text" class="inputs" placeholder="Username / Email" name="username" value="<?= $_COOKIE["loginreminder"]?>"/> <br /><br />
   <input type="password" name="password" class="inputs" placeholder="Password" /> <br /><br />
   <input type="checkbox" name="keep" id="1" class="css-checkbox" /><label for="1" class="css-label">Keep me logged in</label>
   <br><br>
   <input type='hidden' name='backtopage' value='<?= $sendback ?>'>
   <input type='hidden' name='submitbutt' value='Login'>
   <a href="#" onclick="document.getElementById('login').submit();" class="button-big"> Log in</a>
</form>
share|improve this question
    
You could have a submit button instead, and restyle that to look like a link? The submit button could then be a default button. –  Marius George Jun 27 '14 at 16:03
    
Thanks, the problem I have is that it completely changes the appearance of the button even if the same class is applied. See image, the left one is with <input type="submit" value="log in" /> and the right one with the previous <a href="#">... i.imgur.com/4h7I6s6.png –  Marcus Silverman Jun 27 '14 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're using an <a href=... and javascript to submit your form, so the browser doesn't know what the submit action should be.

Change it to

<input type="submit" value="Log in" />

or

<button type="submit">Log in<button>

for the enter key to work automatically.

Using <button></button> or <input type="submit" /> helps with accessibility too.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the problem I have is that it completely changes the appearance of the button even if the same class is applied. See image, the left one is with <input type="submit" value="log in" /> and the right one with the previous <a href="#">... i.imgur.com/4h7I6s6.png –  Marcus Silverman Jun 27 '14 at 16:13
    
You can overcome this issue with CSS –  Marius George Jun 27 '14 at 16:14
    
@MarcusSilverman Buttons style slightly differently than links. You'll have to modify the CSS to make it look right, but it is completely possible to make the button look like the link did. –  Steven V Jun 27 '14 at 16:15
    
@StevenV Thanks, yes the :hover and :active properties from the original css doesn't work either, any ideas? How come the css changes when an input is involved? –  Marcus Silverman Jun 27 '14 at 16:53
    
@MarcusSilverman You would have to post a new question with your CSS to really get to the bottom of it. But browsers ship with inputs being different since they are different elements that serve a different purpose. They have different UI needs like borders, colors, padding, etc to make the user experience make sense. –  Steven V Jun 27 '14 at 17:28

You could add a quick JavaScript snippet to your code to handle the key press.

<script>
   function handleKeys(evt)
   {
      if(evt.keyCode === 13) /*13 is the keyCode for the 'Enter' key*/
      {
        var lgnBtn = document.getElementById('login');
        lgnBtn.submit();
      }
   }

   document.addEventListener('keydown', handleKeys, true);
</script>

You can just cut and paste this into your HTML file, I'm determined it will work. Plus, it's short, sweet, and doesn't hit the headache of using any 3rd party libraries! :D

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @WebWanderer. I'll check it out. –  Marcus Silverman Jun 27 '14 at 16:54

Something like this should work:

var doSubmit = function () {
    document.querySelector( '#login' ).submit();
};

document.querySelector( '#btn' ).addEventListener( 'click', function ( evt ) {
    evt.preventDefault();
    document.querySelector( '#login' ).submit();
}, false);

// var inputs = document.querySelectorAll( 'input' );
// This should be faster since it is constrained to a small portion of the document.
var inputs = document.getElementById( 'login' ).getElementsByTagName( 'input' );
for ( var i = 0, cur; cur = inputs[ i++ ] ; ) {
    if ( cur.type === 'text' || cur.type === 'password' ) {
        cur.addEventListener( 'keypress', function ( evt ) {
            if ( evt.keyCode === 13 ) {
                doSubmit();
            }
        }, false );
    }
}

I hope this serves as an example, but you should really consider what the other people have said about having a submit button.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks appreciate it @FernandoBasso –  Marcus Silverman Jun 27 '14 at 16:53

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