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I'm trying an exercise from page 37 of the Swift Programming Language book from Apple Here's a struct with two enums (from the Swift Programming reference):

 struct Card {
        var rank: Rank
        var suit: Suits

    func description() -> String {
        return "The \(rank.ofRank()) of \(suit.ofSuit())"
    }

    func createDeck() -> (Card[]){
        var deck = Card []()
        for rangeOfSuits in 1...4 {
            for rangeOfRanks in 1...13 {
                println("\(rangeOfRanks)")
                deck.append(Card(rank: Rank.fromRaw(rangeOfRanks)!, suit: Suits.fromRaw(rangeOfSuits)!))
            }
        }
        return (deck)
    }
}

That second method: createDeck() doesn't work. When used

 myDeck.createDeck()

gives compile error: "Card() does not have a member 'createDeck'" However, remove it from the Struct and everything works fine:

func createDeck () -> (Card[]){
    var deck = Card []()
    for rangeOfSuits in 1...4 {
        for rangeOfRanks in 1...13 {
            deck.append(Card(rank: Rank.fromRaw(rangeOfRanks)!, suit: Suits.fromRaw(rangeOfSuits)!))
        }
    }
    return (deck)
}
    myDeck = createDeck()
    myDeck.count             //yields 52, as it should
    myDeck[51].description() //yields King of Clubs as it should.

My answer to the question is: on page 384 of the Swift Programming Language:

“Type Methods Instance methods, as described above, are methods that are called on an instance of a particular type. You can also define methods that are called on the type itself. These kinds of methods are called type methods. You indicate type methods for classes by writing the keyword class before the method’s func keyword, and type methods for structures and enumerations by writing the keyword static before the method’s func keyword.

I am not clear on why one has to do this, but the method works when I add "static" in front of it and fails when I don't.

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on my side it works well with struct, like let cards: Card = Card(rank: Rank.Ace, suit: Suit.Clubs); cards.createDeck() runs like a charm. –  holex Jun 27 at 16:33

2 Answers 2

myDeck.createDeck() by itself makes no sense because you have no Card. A struct is like a class; to send an instance method to it, you need an instance. Instantiate first:

var myDeck = Card() // not really, though
myDeck.createDeck()

However, that code won't work either, because () is not a valid initializer for Card. So replace the first line by an actual initializer.

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Use the static keyword to make a struct func that does not need an instance to exist.

In your example:

struct Card {
// ... 
static func createDeck() -> (Card[]){
    var deck = Card []()
    for rangeOfSuits in 1...4 {
        for rangeOfRanks in 1...13 {
           println("\(rangeOfRanks)")
           deck.append(Card(rank: Rank.fromRaw(rangeOfRanks)!, suit: Suits.fromRaw(rangeOfSuits)!))
            }
        }
        return (deck)
    }
}

Now you may use:

var deck = Card.createDeck()
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