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I have a class and list:

    public class className
    {
        public string firstParam { get; set; }
        public string secondParam { get; set; }
    }

    public static List<className> listName = new List<className>();

The list includes (for example):

Apple    Banana
Corn     Celery
Corn     Celery
Corn     Grapes
Raisins  Pork

I am trying to edit the list (or create a new list) to get:

Apple    Banana
Corn     Celery
Corn     Grapes
Raisins  Pork

I have tried:

var listNoDupes = listName.Distinct();

And:

IEnumerable<className> listNoDupes = listName.Distinct();

But both return the list in the same condition as before, with duplicates.

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How do the CLR know what does 'distinct' mean to you for className objects? –  Konrad Kokosa Jun 27 '14 at 18:56
    
how do you know what to replace the duplicate one with ? –  Eduardo Dennis Jun 27 '14 at 19:12
    
Is the input list always ordered as in your example, or could it be in a completely random order? –  Andrew Morton Jun 27 '14 at 21:28

4 Answers 4

You need to override/implement Equals() and GetHashCode(), right now you are listing distinct instances and they are correctly ALL distinct/unique from each other.

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Oh, I see! I will look into this. –  user2340818 Jun 27 '14 at 19:00
    
Can anyone point to where I can learn how to implement this? –  user2340818 Jun 27 '14 at 19:14
    
@user2340818 google.com/… –  Servy Jun 27 '14 at 19:17
    
It's not a particularly good design to have the identity of the object be mutable properties of that object. –  Servy Jun 27 '14 at 19:17
    
then he should make his properties read only, and my answer is technically correct and the simplest answer. –  T McKeown Jun 27 '14 at 19:24

The problem you are running into is the identity of the objects is not what you think. Your intuition is telling you that the identity is the combination of firstParam and secondParam. What truly is happening is each distinct instance of className has its own identity that does not rely on the implementation of the object. You will need to override the methods provided via System.Object, mainly Equals and GetHashCode although you might get away with not overriding GetHashCode (this will be needed for hash sets to work properly.)

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If your class only contains those two fields then instead of implementing Equals and GetHashCode You can also do:

var listNoDupes = listName.GroupBy(r => new { r.firstParam, r.secondParam })
                        .Select(grp => grp.First())
                        .ToList();

Or you can get an IEnumerable<T> back like:

IEnumerable<className> listNoDupes = 
                       listName
                           .GroupBy(r => new { r.firstParam, r.secondParam })
                           .Select(grp => grp.First());

The code above would group on the properties firstParam and secondParam, later grp.First would return you a single item from the group and you will end up a single item from each group, (no duplicates)

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Although you should remember to consider the size of the data set. –  ChaosPandion Jun 27 '14 at 19:03
    
@ChaosPandion In what way? –  Servy Jun 27 '14 at 19:03
    
Is this advantageous over Equals and GetHashCode? My class does in fact only contain those two fields. –  user2340818 Jun 27 '14 at 19:03
1  
@ChaosPandion It creates one extra item for each item in the list yes, but very short lived objects have a very low overhead. Were the items to be long lived, or the size of the collection be so large that it can fit into memory once, but not twice, then it could potentially be an issue, yes. The list would need to be very large for that to be the case though, making it a situation most people aren't going to be in. –  Servy Jun 27 '14 at 19:20
1  
@ChaosPandion While IGrouping does not itself inherit from IList, the actual MS implementation of GroupBy returns a type that does implement IList, so the optimization you describe is actually performed. –  Servy Jun 30 '14 at 13:51

There is the third possibility - use Distinct method version that takes IEqualityComparer. Unfortunately, C# does not support creating anonymous, temporary implementations of interfaces. We can create helper class and extension:

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    public class LambdaEqualityComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
    {
        private Func<T, T, bool> comparer;
        private Func<T, int> hash;

        public LambdaEqualityComparer(Func<T, T, bool> comparer, 
                                      Func<T, int> hash)
        {
            this.comparer = comparer;
            this.hash = hash;
        }

        public bool Equals(T x, T y)
        {
            return comparer(x, y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(T x)
        {
            return hash(x);
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> Distinct<T>(this IEnumerable<T> elems,
                                             Func<T, T, bool> comparer,
                                             Func<T, int> hash)
    {
        return elems.Distinct(new LambdaEqualityComparer<T>(comparer, hash));
    }
}

and then we can provide lambdas for Distinct method:

var filteredList = myList.Distinct((x, y) => x.firstParam == y.firstParam &&
                                             x.secondParam == y.secondParam,
                                    x => 17 * x.firstParam.GetHashCode() + x.secondParam.GetHashCode());

This allows you to distinct objects on single shot, without implementing Equals and GetHashCode. If, for example, there is a single place in the project, where you are calling such Distinct, this is probably enough to use this extension. If, on the other hand, identity of the className objects is a concept that spans through many methods and classes, for sure it will be better to define simply Equals and GetHashCode.

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17 * x.firstParam.GetHashCode() + x.secondParam.GetHashCode() will cause an exception sometimes if Arithmetic Overflow/Underflow checking is enabled. OK, I guess not many people will enable it in C#, but it could happen. –  Andrew Morton Jun 27 '14 at 21:23
1  
@AndrewMorton Yes, pretty much every GetHashCode implementation you ever write should be in an unchecked block for that reason, just to safeguard against being used in a project without that setting enabled, even though having an entire project be checked is rather uncommon. –  Servy Jun 30 '14 at 13:53

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