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I have a python process (2.7) that takes a key, does a bunch of calculations and returns a list of results. Here is a very simplified version.

I am using multiprocessing to create threads so this can be processed faster. However, my production data has several million rows and each loop takes progressively longer to complete. The last time I ran this each loop took over 6 minutes to complete while at the start it takes a second or less. I think this is because all the threads are adding results into resultset and that continues to grow until it contains all the records.

Is it possible to use multiprocessing to stream the results of each thread (a list) into a csv or batch resultset so it writes to the csv after a set number of rows?

Any other suggestions for speeding up or optimizing the approach would be appreciated.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import csv
import os
import multiprocessing
from multiprocessing import Pool

global keys
keys = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]

def key_loop(key):
    test_df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(1,4), columns=['a','b','c','d'])
    test_list = test_df.ix[0].tolist()
    return test_list

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        pool = Pool(processes=8)      
        resultset = pool.imap(key_loop,(key for key in keys) )

        loaddata = []
        for sublist in resultset:
            loaddata.append(sublist)

        with open("C:\\Users\\mp_streaming_test.csv", 'w') as file:
            writer = csv.writer(file)
            for listitem in loaddata:
                writer.writerow(listitem)
        file.close

        print "finished load"
    except:
        print 'There was a problem multithreading the key Pool'
        raise
share|improve this question
    
Which loop, specifically, took six minutes to complete? How did you measure it? –  dano Jun 27 at 20:33
1  
One obvious inefficient is that you're needlessly copying the several million results in resultset to loaddata, and then iterating over loaddata to write to disk, instead of just iterating over resultset to begin with. –  dano Jun 27 at 20:33
1  
you have several other redundancies here; for example (key for key in keys) could just be keys. also, nitpicking a bit, but the whole point of multiprocessing is that you aren't using threads... :) –  Eevee Jun 27 at 20:37
1  
but yes you should definitely get rid of loaddata. imap is lazy and will return results as they're available, but by iterating over the results twice, you don't start writing to the file until all the results are in. you should save a bit of time if you iterate over the results directly, which will write rows to the file as they become available. –  Eevee Jun 27 at 20:39
1  
@Eevee Yep, I was just going to make that point as well. Also worth noting: the docs state that for very large iterables, you should increase the chunksize kwarg for imap, since it can give large performance boosts. I would try using something like imap(key_loop, keys, chunksize=200) and see if performance is better. Tweak the number up an down and see what does best. –  dano Jun 27 at 20:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is an answer consolidating the suggestions Eevee and I made

keys = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]

def key_loop(key):
    test_df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(1,4), columns=['a','b','c','d'])
    test_list = test_df.ix[0].tolist()
    return test_list

if __name__ == "__main__":
    try:
        pool = Pool(processes=8)      
        resultset = pool.imap(key_loop, keys, chunksize=200)

        with open("C:\\Users\\mp_streaming_test.csv", 'w') as file:
            writer = csv.writer(file)
            for listitem in resultset:
                writer.writerow(listitem)

        print "finished load"
    except:
        print 'There was a problem multithreading the key Pool'
        raise

Again, the changes here are

  1. Iterate over resultset directly, rather than needlessly copying it to a list first.
  2. Feed the keys list directly to pool.imap instead of creating a generator comprehension out of it.
  3. Providing a larger chunksize to imap than the default of 1. The larger chunksize reduces the cost of the inter-process communication required to pass the values inside keys to the sub-processes in your pool, which can give big performance boosts when keys is very large (as it is in your case). You should experiment with different values for chunksize (try something considerably larger than 200, like 5000, etc.) and see how it affects performance. I'm making a wild guess with 200, though it should definitely do better than 1.
share|improve this answer

The following very simple code collects many worker's data into a single CSV file. A worker takes a key and returns a list of rows. The parent processes several keys at a time, using several workers. When each key is done, the parent writes output rows, in order, to a CSV file.

Be careful about order. If each worker writes to the CSV file directly, they'll be out of order or will stomp on each others. Having each worker write to its own CSV file will be fast, but will require merging all the data files together afterward.

source

import csv, multiprocessing, sys

def worker(key):
    return [ [key, 0], [key+1, 1] ]


pool = multiprocessing.Pool()   # default 1 proc per CPU
writer = csv.writer(sys.stdout)

for resultset in pool.imap(worker, [1,2,3,4]):
    for row in resultset:
        writer.writerow(row)

output

1,0
2,1
2,0
3,1
3,0
4,1
4,0
5,1
share|improve this answer

My bet would be that dealing with the large structure at once using appending is what makes it slow. What I usually do is that I open up as many files as cores and use modulo to write to each file immediately such that the streams don't cause trouble compared to if you'd direct them all into the same file (write errors), and also not trying to store huge data. Probably not the best solution, but really quite easy. In the end you just merge back the results.

Define at start of the run:

num_cores = 8
file_sep = ","
outFiles = [open('out' + str(x) + ".csv", "a") for x in range(num_cores)]

Then in the key_loop function:

def key_loop(key):
    test_df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(1,4), columns=['a','b','c','d'])
    test_list = test_df.ix[0].tolist()
    outFiles[key % num_cores].write(file_sep.join([str(x) for x in test_list]) 
                                    + "\n")

Afterwards, don't forget to close: [x.close() for x in outFiles]

Improvements:

  • Iterate over blocks like mentioned in the comments. Writing/processing 1 line at a time is going to be much slower than writing blocks.

  • Handling errors (closing of files)

  • IMPORTANT: I'm not sure of the meaning of the "keys" variable, but the numbers there will not allow modulo to ensure you have each process write to each individual stream (12 keys, modulo 8 will make 2 processes write to the same file)

share|improve this answer
    
interesting idea. do you have an example? –  analyticsPierce Jun 27 at 20:36
    
At second thought, the points made in the comments will be much more relevant. This would give a marginal speed boost, their suggestions much more. –  PascalvKooten Jun 27 at 20:42

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