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When i run test cases, i don't want to store records in my databases. How can i achieve it.

Here is my code :-

class Sample << Test::Unit::TestCase

def setup
 # code
end

def teardown
# code
end

def test_sample
# code
end

end

Am using the following gem:-

gem 'test-unit'

to run tests and api call for GET/POST/PUT/DELETE methods to create/delete records in database.

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Have a look at github.com/thoughtbot/factory_girl –  Benjamin Sinclaire Jun 28 '14 at 6:47
    
@BenjaminSinclaire i think factory_girl doesn't work for me as i using api call for creation/deletion of records. –  karan Jun 28 '14 at 6:56

1 Answer 1

I assume what you mean is that the objects you are using are not persisted in a local database, but rather in a remote system accessed via an API. That is, when you save an objects attributes, they are sent to a remote server via an API call.

Have a look at webmock. It works well with test/unit and test/minitest (which is test/unit on steroids). Basically you define the http call that should result from an action, and pass that to webmock. Then when the action is tested webmock will intercept the http call, and return a mocked response. If the action call is different to the one you defined, web mock will generate an error that will cause the test to fail.

So say on creating a sample, you expect a POST to example.com/samples with a sample attribute :foo set to 'bar', you could write a test like this:

def test_create_sample
  data = 'bar'
  sample = Sample.new 
  sample.foo = data
  stub_request(:post, "example.com/samples/1").
    with(:body => {:sample => {foo: data}})
  assert sample.save
end

This also assumes that your save action checks the api response, and returns true if everything is OK.

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