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I maintain 2 identities one for open source development - which doesn't really contain any personal information. I also have another identity obviously - my real one.

This may be community wiki - but my question is programming related in that when you put software out there, you publish it with some name as the author, and that choice may have real life consequences.

I am considering merging my identities, what are the pro's and con's of this? Is it a good idea, or do privacy concerns outweigh the convenience of maintaining a single identity.

(By the way, this second identity was created out of my World of Warcraft addon development, and I have just continued using it for my open source projects)

Edit: I am considering this, because I am thinking of changing jobs, and I want to refer to my open source work without it looking unprofessional due to the author naming.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, as a part-time open-source hacker, I've recently discovered that ohloh can help you "professionnalize" your identity by allowing you to reclaim all the commits you've done in projects knwon by this engine (and they're numerous).

As a consquence, instead of merging your identities, I would suggest you give them some weight by marketting the contributions you've done.

Besides, I've never considered as valid the fact that commiting for a game plugin as open-èsource activity was not that professionnal. It is code, and code used by non-developpers, which must be noted.

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my ohloh link is in my Stack Overflow profile. Its kind of sparse, I supposed I could spruce it up. –  sylvanaar Mar 15 '10 at 13:16
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In many professions using a pseudonym for publishing works has a long tradition until today: Artists, writers, etc.

Is it really unprofessional for a software developer to do the same?

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Thats my personal opinion - but I am interested in what others may think. –  sylvanaar Mar 15 '10 at 13:18
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If you are good, why not get a little famous? Who knows, if person hiring you is not using/participating in open source project and you'll be valued more from the start?

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