Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have an entity object defined as

public partial class Article  
{  
    public Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }  
    public Text
    {
        get;
        set;
    }  
    public UserId
    {
        get;
        set;
    }  
}

Based on some properties of an Article, I need to determine if the article can be deleted by a given user. So I add a static method to do the checking. Something like:

public partial class Article  
{  
    public static Expression<Func<Article, bool>> CanBeDeletedBy(int userId)
    {  
        //Add logic to be reused here
        return a => a.UserId == userId;
    }  
}

So now I can do

using(MyEntities e = new MyEntities())  
{
    //get the current user id
    int currentUserId = 0;

    e.Articles.Where(Article.CanBeDeletedBy(currentUserid));  
}

So far so good. Now I want to reuse the logic in CanBeDeletedBy while doing a Select, something like:

using(MyEntities e = new MyEntities())  
{
    //get the current user id
    int currentUserId = 0;

    e.Articles.Select(a => new  
    {  
        Text = a.Text,  
        CanBeDeleted = ???  
    };  
}

But no matter what I try, I can't use the expression in the select method. I guess that If I can do

    e.Articles.Select(a => new  
    {  
        Text = a.Text,  
        CanBeDeleted = a => a.UserId == userId
    };  

Then I should be able to use the same expression. Tried to compile the expression and call it by doing

    e.Articles.Select(a => new  
    {  
        Text = a.Text,  
        CanBeDeleted = Article.CanBeDeletedBy(currentUserId).Compile()(a)
    }; 

but it won't work either.

Any ideas on how to get this to work? Or if it isn't possible, what are the alternatives to reuse business logic in both places?

Thanks

Pedro

share|improve this question
    
Compiling the expression is the right choice and it compiles and works for me. If it were me, I would also factor out the compilation. What error are you getting ? –  Saulius Valatka Mar 15 '10 at 12:03
    
Yes, it compiles fine, but throws a NotSupportedException exception: "The LINQ expression node type 'Invoke' is not supported in LINQ to Entities." Tried to compile the expression outside of the Select into a Func<Article,bool> and use it inside, with the same result. –  Pedro Mar 15 '10 at 12:19
    
Btw, if I use a plain Func<Article, bool>, and use it in the Where method, then the query will be executed on the client, which is not the intended purpose. –  Pedro Mar 15 '10 at 12:24
    
Ah, sorry, my bad - missed the fact that you're using EF - it works fine with linq to objects :) –  Saulius Valatka Mar 15 '10 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Re-using expression trees is a black art; you can do it, but you would need to switch a lot of code to reflection and you'd lose all the static checking. In particular, working with the anonymous types becomes a nightmare (although dynamic in 4.0 might be workable).

Further, if you cheat and use Expression.Invoke, then it isn't supported by all providers (most noticeably not on EF in .NET 3.5SP1).

Unless this is a major pain point, I'd leave it with duplication. Or do you need to re-use the expression tree?

share|improve this answer
1  
Don't really need to re-use the expression tree. It was just to try not duplicate security related code. But I will do it for now, and see if I can refactor the code later. Thanks –  Pedro Mar 15 '10 at 14:01

What I did is I used PredicateBuilder which is a class in LinqKit and also AsExpandable() http://www.albahari.com/nutshell/linqkit.aspx to build up expressions and I stored them Statically as

public readonly Expression<Func<T,bool>>

in a static class. Each expression was building on a previous expression thus reducing the amount of duplication.

As the previous question by Marc Gravell suggests this kinda thing is a black art, but thankfully a lot of the work has been done by other poeple.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.