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I'd like to achieve something like this:

SELECT 
  (CASE WHEN ...) AS FieldA,
  FieldA + 20 AS FieldB
FROM Tbl

Assuming that by "..." I've replaced a long and complex CASE statement, I don't want to repeat it when selecting FieldB and use the aliased FieldA instead.

Note, that this will return multiple rows, hence the DECLARE/SET outside the SELECT statement is no good in my case.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A workaroud would be to use a sub-query:

SELECT
  FieldA,
  FieldA + 20 AS FieldB
FROM (
  SELECT 
    (CASE WHEN ...) AS FieldA
  FROM Tbl
) t

To improve readability you could also use a CTE:

WITH t AS (
  SELECT 
    (CASE WHEN ...) AS FieldA
  FROM Tbl
)
SELECT
  FieldA,
  FieldA + 20 AS FieldB
FROM
  t
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2  
or maybe a CTE to enhance readability. –  JohnFx Mar 15 '10 at 14:28
    
@JohnFx: Good point, extended my answer. –  Peter Lang Mar 15 '10 at 14:43
    
Personally I find the derived table easier to read, but that's just me. –  HLGEM Mar 15 '10 at 21:19

When I have complicated logic to compute a "virtual" column value from other column values in a table I generally create a single-table view of the original table with all the original columns plus the computed values as well. Then I do other SELECTs against the view. That allows me:

  1. To name my computed columns.

  2. To keep the logic for the computations in one place instead of scattered through various queries in the application.

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Do you know if it is better for performance? –  Fractaliste May 13 at 12:29
    
Will make no difference to performance unless you're using an engine that offers materialized views and you create this as a materialized view, in which case you'll decrease write performance but increase query performance. –  Larry Lustig May 13 at 14:42

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