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I'm new to Python. I'm attempting to make a dictionary of sequence alignments. --- In biology, sequence alignment means sliding one sequence across usually a larger sequence. When the 2 sequences align, a match is recorded. I want to find all possible matches in list1 and list2 for all possible slices of each item in list1.

The tools for sequence alignment in biology do not work well with non-biological strings, requiring amino acid or nucleotide one letter codes. I want to create a tool that works with any string.

I'm searching 2 lists: list1, list2, both containing only strings. The search string (sslice) comes only from list1. The search string (sslice) is generated by iterating over slices from each item (item1) in list1. The search string (sslice) is searched for in list1 itself then, list2. When a search is found, a counter increases. The string splice found (sslice)=key and number of times found (count)=value in my_dict.

The goal: I have previously created a my_string. From it 2 lists were made: list1 and list2. List1 is every substring of my_string which occurs only once. List2 is every substring of my_string which occurs multiple times. The code below is an attempt to mine substrings of list1 & list2 which compose each other.

The problem: Is there an infinite loop somewhere? The process runs forever without output :(

#Sample list1, list2 and desired my_dict:

list1=['and', 'a', 'ant'] 
#Search slices come from list1: sslice=item1[start:end]
list2=['and', 'b', 'an']
my_dict={'a':  5, 'an': 4, 'and': 2,  'n': 4, 'nd': 2, 'd': 2, 'ant': 1, 'nt': 1, 't': 1}
#         s        e        e          s       e        s       se        s        s
#new start slice index marked "s", new end slice index marked "e", new start & end index "se"
#slices 'a' item1[0:1] 'an' item1[0:2] 'and' item1[0:3] 'n' item1[1:2] 'nd' item1 [1:3] 'd' item1[2:3] 'ant' item1[0:3] 'nt' item1[1:3] 't' item1[2:3]
#found 'a' 5 times, 'an' 4x, 'and' 2x, 'n' 4x, 'nd' 2x, 'd' 2x, 'ant' 1x, 'nt' 1x, 't' 1x

my_dict=dict()
for item1 in list1:
    for item2 in list1:
        start=0
        end=start+1
        count=0
        sslice=item1[start:end]
        while start<len(item1):
            if sslice in item2:
                count+=1
                my_dict.update({sslice:count})
                end+=1
                sslice=item1[start:end]
            if end>=len(item1):
                start+=1
                end=start+1
            if start>=len(item1):
                 break
    for item3 in list2:
        start=0
        end=start+1
        count=0
        sslice=item1[start:end]
        while start<len(item1):
            if sslice in item3:
                count+=1
                my_dict.update({sslice:count})
                end+=1
                sslice=item1[start:end]
            if end>=len(item1):
                start+=1
                end=start+1
            if start>=len(item1):
                break                          
print my_dict
share|improve this question
1  
can u share ur list1 and list 2, expected output – sundar nataraj Jun 29 '14 at 4:03
    
Give me a few minutes and I'll try to come up with a simple sample list1, list2, and output. – mattkaeo Jun 29 '14 at 4:11
    
"The tools for sequence alignment in biology do not work well with all string types" - what does it mean? – alfasin Jun 29 '14 at 4:17
    
Please define "sequence alignments" – alfasin Jun 29 '14 at 4:20
    
In biology, sequence alignment means sliding one sequence across usually a larger sequence. When the 2 sequences align, a match is recorded. I want to find all possible matches in list1 and list2 for all possible slices of each item in list1. – mattkaeo Jun 29 '14 at 4:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think your intention is this but I have no idea what it means:

from collections import defaultdict

list1 = [' c', ' a', ' d', 'ee', ' i', 'om', 'a ', 'al', ' s', 'ay', 'ar', 'me', 'ha', 'he', 'e to', 's ', 'l ', 'e th', 'll', "r'", 'su', 'o ', 're', 'sh', 'mp', 'er', 'mm', '?']

list2 = ['a', 'h', 'm', 'l', 'o', 's', 'r', 'e t']

my_dict = defaultdict(int)
for item1 in list1:
    for start in range(len(item1)):
        for end in range(start + 1, len(item1)):
            sslice = item1[start:end]
            my_dict[sslice] += sum(sslice in item2 for item2 in list1)
            my_dict[sslice] += sum(sslice in item3 for item3 in list2)

print my_dict

It's also possible you want for end in range(start + 1, len(item1) + 1). Again, no idea what you are trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx Hugh. I will attempt this. I have previously created a my_string. From it 2 lists were made: list1 and list2. List1 is every substring of my_string which occurs only once. list2 is every substring of my_string which occurs multiple times. The above code is an attempt to find substrings of list1 & list2 which compose each other. – mattkaeo Jun 29 '14 at 6:05
    
Works perfect! Thx Hugh. I'll have to look up defaultdict and focus on the line "my_dict[sslice] += sum(sslice in item2 for item2 in list1)" I think I understand how it works. – mattkaeo Jun 29 '14 at 6:53
    
@mattkaeo: my_dict[sslice] += sum(sslice in item2 for item2 in list1) means, "count how many times sslice is in each of the item2 in list1, and increment my_dict[sslice] by that amount." Since we are using defaultdict(int), my_dict[sslice] is 0 if the key does not yet appear in my_dict. – hughdbrown Jun 29 '14 at 15:52
    
That's useful. I find myself creating counters and appreciate tools which could circumvent that. – mattkaeo Jun 30 '14 at 4:01

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