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The PHP type hints does not support scalar variable [1] such as int or string

However, we found it is still very useful to annotate the type (int or string) in our function during continuos integration to spot bugs, e.g.

Currently I use method like

function foo($s) {
    //assert( is_string($s), 'not a string' );
    ...
}

During unit testing and in development mode, the assert will be un-commented to spot potential errors.

I am looking if there is better way to do it.

[1] http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.typehinting.php

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If a method requires a parameter of certain type to work properly, why not throw an InvalidArgumentException when the type is not correct? Why should the check be optional? –  gontrollez Jul 9 '14 at 14:56

3 Answers 3

An interesting and elegant solution would be AOP. You could remove all assertions from your code and start using standard phpdocs like this:

/**
* @param string $s
*/
function foo($s) {
    ...
}

Then during unit testing and in the development mode you use AOP framework, like this one: http://go.aopphp.com/blog/2013/02/11/aspect-oriented-framework-for-php/

From their documentation:

...with the help of 10-20 lines of code we can intercept all the public, protected and static methods in all the classes of application...

You would use it to intercept all methods on the fly, read agruments, get ReflectionMethod object, parse type related comments and do the runtime check. It sounds complex but that's pretty easy to do.

In result: It will eat some runtime resources during testing per each included PHP file (not much) but it will looks much better(cleaner) for your code base.

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Actually, @Howard can use a technique, called Design-by-Contract. This paradigm is widely used in some languages, but for PHP it can be implemented only with AOP. I have developed the PhpDeal framework on top of the Go! AOP to implement DbC for PHP. Check it! –  Alexander Aug 6 '14 at 15:06
    
Yes, you can use AOP. That means you have to have another tool, forever, in your development process. You'll have to trust that the AOP tool actually works everywhere, and will work with the next PHP release. The programmers must trained to use it (they'll resist). They have to remember to use it. Your AOP-based assertions will be separate from the source code, so it will be poor (e.g, unconsulted) documentation for the maintenance programmer looking at it. That's a lot of "if"s... on which to base a production development process. I proposed a simpler solution in another answer. –  Ira Baxter Aug 6 '14 at 16:20
    
... A maintainer, staring at and modifying code will have to remember to inspect and update the AOP part; most of the time it won't change and the inspection is inconvenient, so people will develop the habit of not looking. Then after he fixes it the AOP will spring a surprise, depending on when it is actually run. That's a lot of additional activities you need in your development process. Unless management comes down like a sledgehammer to insist on consistent usage, I suspect it won't happen. I proposed a simpler solution in another answer. –  Ira Baxter Aug 6 '14 at 16:25

If you don't mind a bit of overhead in your application, consider defining a set of type-checking functions in a file "typecheck.php":

   assert_string($s) {  
      assert( is_string($), 'not a string');
   }

   assert_int($i) { 
     assert( is_int($i), 'not an integer);
   }

   ... lots more type checks as appropriate ...

"require" this "typecheck.php" at the top of all your scripts, and write something similar to your example to do type checks:

    require("typecheck.php");
    ...
    function foo($s) {
       assert_string($s); 
    ...

Then you don't need to comment the checks in and out. This has the nice added property that written code contains the assertions, as documentation, to help the code maintainer; their presence will ensure they are checked when he changes the code, and will remind him to add more as needed.

You can add all kinds of convenient, specialized checks this way; consider:

     assert_integer_range($i, $l, $u) {
         assert_int($i);
         assert($i>=$l);
         assert($i<=$u);
    }

with

     bar($n) {
         assert_integer_range($n,1,10);
     ...

Any decent static analysis tool you might be able to get will benefit a lot from the presence of the assertions.

If the overhead of the assert_xxx calls is too much for you to suffer in production code, you can lower the cost for production code. Have an alternative "typecheck.php" file use with production code, which defines the same functions, but that don't do the check. Not perfect but it will help.

This solution doesn't require any tools above and beyond the text editor each programmer already has.

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I use a combination of solutions, similar to the answers below.

Use standard docblocks like this:

/**
 * This function sets InternalVariable to be $s
 * @param string $s
 */
function foo($s) 
{
    ...
}

Now, I also combine PHP_CodeSniffer to ensure Docblocks are enabled to ensure that the comments have been put in place, and defined.

PHPUnit is then used with the assert to test that the function still uses a string.

class FOO_TEST
{
    public function test_foo()
    {
        $TestObject = new FOO_CLASS();
        $TestObject->Foo(1);
        $this->assertTrue( is_string($TestObject->InternalString, 'Foo should have accepted a string') );
    }
}

As a rule, if a variable passed to the function has to be a certain type, then you can always enforce that in the function itself.

If you are using newer PHP, then consider using the Standard PHP Library SPL-Types

/**
 * This function sets InternalVariable to be $s
 * @param SplString $s
 */
function foo(SplString $s) 
{
    ...
}

This will now also give compile time validation.

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