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In our environment, we can not use the SSH keys, so I want to use expect. With my expect file, I want to copy two files, run a command on the remote server and, if needed, update the know_hosts file of my local sever.

#!/usr/bin/expect
set username root
set pass root123
set host xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
spawn scp <file1> ${username}@${host}:/root/
expect -re "Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)"
send "yes\r"
expect -re "Password:"
send "${pass}\r"
expect -re "$"
spawn scp <file2> ${username}@${host}:/root/
expect -re "Password:"
send "${pass}\r"
expect -re "$"
spawn ssh ${username}@${host} <command>
expect -re "Password:"
send "${pass}\r"
expect -re "$"
interact

With above file, I get this error: ssh: connect to host xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx port 22: Connection timed out lost connection

Checking the remote server, I can see that every other time, one file is copied before i get the timeout.

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2 Answers 2

If I'm not mistaken, that you only see one file on the remote host, is because you keep looking for the string "Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)" each time you connect to the remote host, even though this is only needed the first time you connect to the remote host or when the remote host has changed its fingerprint (which can be a sign of spoofing attacks, but in most secure networks is simply the result of an update).

If the file you find on the remote server is <file2> and no longer an updated copy of <file1>, then this confirms my thoughts. You should then remove that line (and its subsequent one) from your expect script.

Alternatively, you could modify your expect script to look for either that "first connect" string if it's present or skip to the password check.

However, you have a second problem, unrelated to the first: the connection time-out upon ssh'ing to the remote host. It could be because the remote host is not sending the exact string Password back, maybe it's password. You should check this in an interactive session first.

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I would do something like this:

proc send_file {file username host password} {
    spawn scp $file ${username}@${host}:/root/
    expect {
        "Are you sure you want to continue connecting (yes/no)" {
            send "yes\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        "Password:"
            send "${pass}\r"
            exp_continue
        }
        eof
    }
}

send_file "file1" $username $host $pass
send_file "file2" $username $host $pass

spawn ssh ${username}@${host} <command>
expect -re "Password:"
send "${pass}\r"
expect -re "$"
interact
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When i try this, I get an error: Password: usage: send [args] string while executing "send" invoked from within –  user3787481 Jun 30 '14 at 2:01

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