Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

I know it is a strange question did someone have had a case where a C# object return null after newing it up?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Flexo Apr 20 '14 at 21:14

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Flexo
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

Are you experiencing this problem? If it was a C/C++ application I'd say you were running out of memory. – ChrisF Mar 15 '10 at 14:36
I've heard of such stories on ancient machines which had insufficient free memory for a program to run. – user151323 Mar 15 '10 at 14:37
What's in your constructor? You might be throwing an exception and depending on your exception handling you might be missing it. – used2could Mar 15 '10 at 14:38
Constructors don't return anything - could you be a little more precise - code snippet might help. – Paddy Mar 15 '10 at 14:41
Thanks for all people answered. No was not a trick question! But it ends up that the developer looked into the wrong sources and therefore this was misleading us. Sorry!! – mbr Mar 15 '10 at 14:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not possible by design, you'll always get an OutOfMemory exception if a new object cannot be created. A corrupted garbage collected heap is technically possible, invariably triggered by misbehaving unmanaged code, but I never heard of any cases where that didn't trigger an ExcecutionEngineException.

share|improve this answer

Is this a trick question?

int? i = new int?();

if (i == null)
    Console.WriteLine("It's null!");
share|improve this answer
BAHAHAA, LOL @ Luke – used2could Mar 15 '10 at 14:43

I'm thinking he's got failing logic in the constructor of his object. There's no way this is happening to an object native to the framework.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.