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it's safe to convert from long double to float/double/int just using cast? in C, if I cast a type T1 to T2 will I safely have in variable of type T2 exactly all bits which this type can hold no more no less or am I missing something, say, an UB? I'm asking that because in C what you see is not exactly what you think it does.

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The compiler will do its best to convert with as little loss of precision as possible –  YePhIcK Jun 29 at 22:13
    
@YePhIcK: That's to be hoped for any reasonable implementation. –  Deduplicator Jun 29 at 22:28

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

In standard C, if the value can be represented exactly in the target type, the value is preserved.
If it is in the range of the target type, one of the two nearest value (implementation-defined rules for the choice) results.
Otherwise, we strictly speaking have Undefined Behavior, unless the implementation claims IEEE60559 conformance.

6.3.1.4 Real floating and integer

1 When a finite value of real floating type is converted to an integer type other than _Bool, the fractional part is discarded (i.e., the value is truncated toward zero). If the value of the integral part cannot be represented by the integer type, the behavior is undefined.61)
2 When a value of integer type is converted to a real floating type, if the value being converted can be represented exactly in the new type, it is unchanged. If the value being converted is in the range of values that can be represented but cannot be represented exactly, the result is either the nearest higher or nearest lower representable value, chosen in an implementation-defined manner. If the value being converted is outside the range of values that can be represented, the behavior is undefined. Results of some implicit conversions may be represented in greater range and precision than that required by the new type (see 6.3.1.8 and 6.8.6.4).

6.3.1.5 Real floating types

1 When a value of real floating type is converted to a real floating type, if the value being converted can be represented exactly in the new type, it is unchanged. If the value being converted is in the range of values that can be represented but cannot be represented exactly, the result is either the nearest higher or nearest lower representable value, chosen in an implementation-defined manner. If the value being converted is outside the range of values that can be represented, the behavior is undefined. Results of some implicit conversions may be represented in greater range and precision than that required by the new type (see 6.3.1.8 and 6.8.6.4).

The situation is much improved if your implementation claims IEEE60559-conformant floating-point by defining the preprocessor-macro __STDC_IEC_559__.

— The conversions for floating types provide the IEC 60559 conversions between floating-point precisions.
— The conversions from integer to floating types provide the IEC 60559 conversions from integer to floating point.
— The conversions from floating to integer types provide IEC 60559-like conversions but always round toward zero.

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