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So, I finish my lecture work very quickly during my lectures, so my professor likes to challenge me by making me be a little more extensively ridiculous with the projects, and this one got me stumped.

"Given a text file, "words.txt", use list comprehension to read in all of the words in the file, and find all the words that contain at least 2 vowels."

So, I have a text file:

The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

And, the best attempt at getting all the words, and all the words with two or more vowels is:

#This could be hardcoded in, but for the sake of simplicity (as simple as simplicity gets)
vowels = ["a","e","i","o","u"]
filename = "words.txt"
words = [word for word in open(filename, "r").read().split()]
multivowels = [each for each in open(filename, "r").read().split() if sum(letter in vowels for letter in each) >= 2]

The output should mimic:

All words in the file:  ['The', 'quick', 'brown', 'fox', 'jumps', 'over', 'the', 'lazy', 'dog']
The words in the file that contain 2 or more vowels: ['quick', 'over']

My attempt to put this into one line was just to print the list comprehension side of "words" and "multivowels" as well as the "All words in the file; "... etc.

Is there anyone out there for the challenge of combining these two list comprehensions into one? My teammate and I are stumped, but would love to show it off to our professor!

Again, my final, single-line code is:

print "All words in the file: " + str([word for word in open(filename, "r").read().split()]) + "\nAll words with more than 2 vowels: " + str([each for each in open(filename, "r").read().split() if sum(letter in vowels for letter in each) >= 2])

EDIT: My attempt at getting all words in the file, as well as all the words with two or more vowels.

vowels = ["a", "e", "i", "o", "u"]
filename = "words.txt"
print [(word, each) for word in open(filename, "r").read().split() if sum([1 for each in word if each in vowels]) >= 2]
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3  
why write it in a single line? It makes debugging and readability FAR more difficult –  redFIVE Jun 30 at 2:01
    
I wouldn't read the file twice. –  James Mills Jun 30 at 2:04
1  
Does your professor give credit for you having others solve the problem? –  martineau Jun 30 at 2:07
    
The reason of writing it in a single line is just to prove to my professor that I can beat his challenges. It is absolutely, undoubtedly a horrible way to code. But, he challenged me to do it, so I have to at least try! It is just for fun at this point. I just wanted to see if anyone had any insight. –  brettwbyron Jun 30 at 2:07
    
the already opened file can be reset by using .seek(0) –  karthikr Jun 30 at 2:07

3 Answers 3

There are some corner cases to deal with here, but if you assume a simple text file:

import re
vowels = "a","e","i","o","u"

answer = [[word for word in re.sub("[^\w]", " ",  sentence).split() if (sum(1 for letter in word if letter in vowels)>=2)] for sentence in open(filename,"r").readlines()]
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So, thank you all for your input. There were a lot of really interesting approaches to finding the words with two or more vowels. I spoke with my professor this morning about the difficulties I had with this problem, and he cleared up a misunderstanding I had.

I was under the impression that he wanted the single list comprehension to return a list containing a list of all of the words in the file, and a list of only the words with two or more vowels. But, in fact, he just wanted what I had finished; a list comprehension for each scenario: all the words in the file; all the words in the file with two or more vowels.

Thank you all for your input!

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I ran a slightly different version on a larger data set and found the repeated calls to str starts to add up.

vowels = ['a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u']
#filename = 'vowelcount.txt'
filename = 'largetextfile.txt'
print "All words in the file: ", [w for w in open(filename).read().split()], "\n", "All words with more than 2 vowels: ", [w for w in open(filename).read().split() if sum(1 for l in w if l in vowels) > 1]

Calling this version with cProfile shows a small improvement:

python -m cProfile vowelcount1.py

   7839 function calls in 0.023 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.005    0.005    0.023    0.023 vowelcount1.py:1(<module>)
     6045    0.009    0.000    0.009    0.000 vowelcount1.py:4(<genexpr>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'read' of 'file' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'split' of 'str' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {open}
     1786    0.009    0.000    0.018    0.000 {sum}

The code you put has just about double the number of function calls:

#filename = 'vowelcount.txt'
filename = 'largetextfile.txt'
vowels = ['a', 'e', 'i', 'o', 'u']
print "All words in the file: " + str([word for word in open(filename, "r").read().split()]) + "\nAll words with more than 2 vowels: " + str([each for each in open(filename, "r").read().split() if sum(letter in vowels for letter in each) >= 2])

python -m cProfile vowelcount2.py

   14568 function calls in 0.036 seconds

   Ordered by: standard name

   ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
        1    0.004    0.004    0.036    0.036 vowelcount2.py:2(<module>)
    12774    0.016    0.000    0.016    0.000 vowelcount2.py:4(<genexpr>)
        1    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'disable' of '_lsprof.Profiler' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'read' of 'file' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {method 'split' of 'str' objects}
        2    0.000    0.000    0.000    0.000 {open}
     1786    0.016    0.000    0.032    0.000 {sum}

As everyone has already obviously mentioned, this is not how you want to be writing code others will have to be reading. Although I admit to seeing how much I can fit into one python list comprehension for fun too :D

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