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I've got very slow Mysql queries coming up from my wordpress site. It's making everything slow and I think this is eating up CPU usage. I've pasted the Explain results for the two most frequently problematic queries below. This is a typical result - although very occasionally teh queries do seem to be performed at a more normal speed.

I have the usual wordpress indexes on the database tables. You will see that one of the queries is generated from wordpress core code, and not from anything specific - like the theme - for my site.

I have a vague feeling that the database is not always using the indexes/is not using them properly...

Is this right? Does anyone know how to fix it? Or is it a different problem entirely?

Many thanks in advance for any help anyone can offer - it is hugely appreciated

Query: [wp-blog-header.php(14): wp()]

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'private') ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 6
id
select_type
table
type
possible_keys
key
key_len
ref
rows
Extra
1
SIMPLE
wp_posts
ref
type_status_date
type_status_date
63
const
427
Using where; Using filesort
Query time: 34.2829 (ms)

9) Query: [wp-content/themes/LMHR/index.php(40): query_posts()]

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.ID NOT IN ( SELECT tr.object_id FROM wp_term_relationships AS tr INNER JOIN wp_term_taxonomy AS tt ON tr.term_taxonomy_id = tt.term_taxonomy_id WHERE tt.taxonomy = 'category' AND tt.term_id IN ('217', '218', '223', '224') ) AND wp_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_posts.post_status = 'publish' OR wp_posts.post_status = 'private') ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 6
id
select_type
table
type
possible_keys
key
key_len
ref
rows
Extra
1
PRIMARY
wp_posts
ref
type_status_date
type_status_date
63
const
427
Using where; Using filesort
2
DEPENDENT SUBQUERY
tr
ref
PRIMARY,term_taxonomy_id
PRIMARY
8
func
1
Using index
2
DEPENDENT SUBQUERY
tt
eq_ref
PRIMARY,term_id_taxonomy,taxonomy
PRIMARY
8
antin1_lovemusic2010.tr.term_taxonomy_id
1
Using where
Query time: 70.3900 (ms)
share|improve this question
    
I edited your queries to look like code, but I don't understand what the text and the end is. Did you paste this from somewhere and get undesirable text in there somewhere? –  JSBձոգչ Mar 15 '10 at 15:31
    
@JS Bangs I think this is MySQL "EXPLAIN" command result from grid. –  antyrat Mar 15 '10 at 15:33

2 Answers 2

Check this http://core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/10964

The problem is SQL_CALC_NUM_ROWS, WordPress set this param automatically when you execute get_posts query, this make a slow query.

share|improve this answer

You can try wp-cache plugin. Also you can read this article it explains that SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS not the best solution at queries.

share|improve this answer
    
@JS Bangs @antyrat Thanks for looking at this so quickly! yes - it's an explain result (actually generated from Wp-Tuner plugin). The bit at the end is what Explain says the database is doing and the very long time it is taking to do it... –  tash Mar 15 '10 at 15:37
    
I have WP Super Cache running - but the wp-blog-header queries are generated before the page loads, so the caching is not helping this area. Also I'd like to fix the slowness of the Mysql query if possible, rather than cache the slow result. –  tash Mar 15 '10 at 15:39
    
@tash how many entries do you have at your databse wt the wp_posts table? –  antyrat Mar 15 '10 at 15:50
    
Hello antyrat, thanks for your help. About 1,300 entries in wp-posts –  tash Mar 15 '10 at 15:53
    
I've updated my answer, maybe you shouldn't use SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS at your queries? –  antyrat Mar 15 '10 at 16:00

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