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I want to convert an int to a byte[2] array using BCD.

The int in question will come from DateTime representing the Year and must be converted to two bytes.

Is there any pre-made function that does this or can you give me a simple way of doing this?

example:

int year = 2010

would output:

byte[2]{0x20, 0x10};
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted
    static byte[] Year2Bcd(int year) {
        if (year < 0 || year > 9999) throw new ArgumentException();
        int bcd = 0;
        for (int digit = 0; digit < 4; ++digit) {
            int nibble = year % 10;
            bcd |= nibble << (digit * 4);
            year /= 10;
        }
        return new byte[] { (byte)((bcd >> 8) & 0xff), (byte)(bcd & 0xff) };
    }

Beware that you asked for a big-endian result, that's a bit unusual.

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1  
Big-endian may not very unusual if he is working with embedded hardware. –  Matthew Whited Mar 15 '10 at 16:09
    
Works great thanks! In this case i dont think Endian matters, I am careful with it but in this case it ok. –  Lily Mar 15 '10 at 16:18

Here's a terrible brute-force version. I'm sure there's a better way than this, but it ought to work anyway.

int digitOne = year / 1000;
int digitTwo = (year - digitOne * 1000) / 100;
int digitThree = (year - digitOne * 1000 - digitTwo * 100) / 10;
int digitFour = year - digitOne * 1000 - digitTwo * 100 - digitThree * 10;

byte[] bcdYear = new byte[] { digitOne << 4 | digitTwo, digitThree << 4 | digitFour };

The sad part about it is that fast binary to BCD conversions are built into the x86 microprocessor architecture, if you could get at them!

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Here is a slightly cleaner version then Jeffrey's

static byte[] IntToBCD(int input)
{
    if (input > 9999 || input < 0)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("input");

    int thousands = input / 1000;
    int hundreds = (input -= thousands * 1000) / 100;
    int tens = (input -= hundreds * 100) / 10;
    int ones = (input -= tens * 10);

    byte[] bcd = new byte[] {
        (byte)(thousands << 4 | hundreds),
        (byte)(tens << 4 | ones)
    };

    return bcd;
}
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You can probably come up with some crazy way that uses Boolean logic and shifting... but this will be much nicer to maintain. –  Matthew Whited Mar 15 '10 at 15:59
static byte[] IntToBCD(int input) { 
    byte[] bcd = new byte[] { 
        (byte)(input>> 8), 
        (byte)(input& 0x00FF) 
    };
    return bcd;
}
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1  
This is not BCD. you are just converting the int into to a two byte array, –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 11 '11 at 16:14

More common solution

    private IEnumerable<Byte> GetBytes(Decimal value)
    {
        Byte currentByte = 0;
        Boolean odd = true;
        while (value > 0)
        {
            if (odd)
                currentByte = 0;

            Decimal rest = value % 10;
            value = (value-rest)/10;

            currentByte |= (Byte)(odd ? (Byte)rest : (Byte)((Byte)rest << 4));

            if(!odd)
                yield return currentByte;

            odd = !odd;
        }
        if(!odd)
            yield return currentByte;
    }
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You shouldn't use a decimal as input parameter if all you can compute is an integer. If you need a decimal for your internal computation it should stay internal or how do you compute GetBytes(3.55549322);? –  Oliver Feb 22 '12 at 13:49

I made a generic routine posted at IntToByteArray that you could use like:

var yearInBytes = ConvertBigIntToBcd(2010, 2);

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