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I want to grep a particular command/word say int from a file.
But I want to eliminate all those lines which are commented.
(I want to ignore if int is after # ).

My file content :

int a
def
abc int
adbc asdfj #int
abc # int
# int abc
abc int #
int # abc

I want output as :

int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc 

I tried using grep -e "int" | grep -v -e "#" . But problem is int # abc is also getting eliminated.

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If integer but not standalone int appeared on the line, would you want that line output or not? –  Ed Morton Jun 30 '14 at 13:42
    
@EdMorton: No I dont want that. I want lines containing word 'int' –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 13:45
    
And what about lines like foo int # bar int - should that line be printed or not? –  Ed Morton Jun 30 '14 at 13:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I see some deleted answers with this valid single-regex answer: grep '^[^#]*\<int\>'

grep '^[^#]*\<int\>' <<END
int a
def
abc int
adbc asdfj #int
abc # int
abc int #
int # abc
print abc  # int -- should not see this line
END
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

Do you have int on both sides of the #? What should you do in that case?

$ echo "int foo # int bar" | grep '^[^#]*\<int\>'
int foo # int bar

To see if "int" is used in the file, use grep's -q option:

if grep -q '^[^#]*\<int\>' file; then 
    echo "I have an 'int'"
else
    echo "No int here"
fi

To pass the word as a parameter, you need double quotes, and escape the backslashes:

type="int"
if grep -q "^[^#]*\\<$type\\>"; then ...
share|improve this answer
    
can you provide an explanation of how this works please :) –  user3442743 Jun 30 '14 at 11:00
    
Anchored at the start of the line (^), find zero or more characters that are not a hash ([^#]*) followed by the stand-alone word "int" (\<int\> -- \< is a "start of word" marker, \> is "end of word") –  glenn jackman Jun 30 '14 at 11:09
    
What I need is to simply check whether the word "int" is used in the file or not. I also need to ensure that it should not be used in comment, usage should be actual. That is my exact need. I am grepping it, after that if [ $i -eq 0] then I will know that it has been used.so int foo # int bar should give output as actual usage –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 11:19
    
actually int will be stored in a variable. "i". int was just for example –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 11:20
    
@gelnn jackman: I used this grep -w "^[^#]*$i". It worked fine for me. Why did you change the answer –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 11:41

And the one through sed,

$ sed '/#.*int/d' file
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

It just deletes the line in which the string int is just after to # symbol.

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If I use this command, will it work in all cases ? grep "int" file | grep -v -e "#.*int" –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 8:17
    
yes, it should work.. –  Avinash Raj Jun 30 '14 at 8:26
    
That will print lines where int does not appear. –  glenn jackman Jun 30 '14 at 10:50

Using awk you can do:

awk '/int/ && !/#.*int/' file
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

This will get all line that contains int but ignore if int comes after # (comment)

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1  
This will remove if int is after any comment, i know it works for OPs sample file but say he had 'int # abc int`. It would remove that line as well, not sure if OP cares about that but it is something to think about –  user3442743 Jun 30 '14 at 8:03
    
If I use this command, will it work in all cases ? grep "int" file | grep -v -e "#.*int" –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 8:17
    
@Jidder That is true. It will remove line like data to read # I do use int to make this to work. And this is correct when you read OPs comment (I want to ignore if int is after #). Not saying anything about start of line, nor about word between # and int –  Jotne Jun 30 '14 at 9:03
    
I know that OP did not mention it could be before and after the #, but i'm not sure if it has just been overlooked by OP. In any case your answer answers OPs question perfectly for what was asked so it was just a thought :) –  user3442743 Jun 30 '14 at 9:14
    
@PratikKumar that example contains int ? –  user3442743 Jun 30 '14 at 9:39

Can you use perl? if so it's a piece of cake:

perl -ne '/int/ && !/#(.*?)int/ && print' file 
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

Another alternative is to use -P for grep:

grep -Pv '#.*?int' file | grep int
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

If you want to ignore all comments it can be done with sed :

grep -Pv '#.*?int' file | grep int | sed -re 's/#.*//g'
int a
abc int
abc int 
int 

Using variable instead of "int":

i="int"; grep -Pv "#.*?$i" file | grep "$i"
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc
share|improve this answer
    
No I am using bash. –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 10:12
    
@PratikKumar perl is a program used in bash as same as awk sed and grep –  Jotne Jun 30 '14 at 10:14
    
@PratikKumar does your grep support -P? –  Tiago Jun 30 '14 at 10:14
    
@Tiago yes it supports -P. It is coming in grep --help –  Pratik Kumar Jun 30 '14 at 10:21
    
@PratikKumar I added to my answer an alternative to Perl using only grep :) –  Tiago Jun 30 '14 at 10:22

This MIGHT be what you want, using GNU awk for word boundaries:

$ awk -F'#' '$1~/\<int\>/' file
int a
abc int
abc int #
int # abc

depending on what you want to do if int appears both before and after the #.

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