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I have the following assembly code:

segment      .data
     sayi db 1

segment      .text
     global _start

_start: 

     mov ecx, sayi
     inc ecx
     mov [sayi], ecx

     mov eax, 4             ;system call number for output(sys_write)
     mov ebx, 1             ;default output device
     mov ecx, sayi          ;message to write
     mov edx, 4             ;message length   
     int 0x80               ;call kernel

     mov eax,1              ;The system call for exit (sys_exit)
     mov ebx,0              ;Exit with return code of 0 (no error)
     int 0x80               ;call kernel 

I just try to increment a number and print it. This compiles successfully, but doesn't print anything to screen. What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
1  
Doesn't sys_write expect to be handed a string? – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 30 '14 at 8:16
up vote 0 down vote accepted

There are a couple of problems with your code:

 mov ecx, sayi
 inc ecx
 mov [sayi], ecx

The first line will copy the address of sayi into ecx, not the value at sayi. To get the value you would write mov ecx,[sayi]. Another issue is that you've only reserved a single byte of space at sayi , but you're trying to access it as if it was a dword (4 bytes). To reserve a dword you should use dd instead of db.

Then there's the problem with your printing. The sys_write syscall prints whatever ecx points to as a sequence of characters. It doesn't do any conversion from integers to strings, so that's something you'll have to do yourself. Here's an example NASM implementation of doing such a conversion that I wrote for an earlier question:

; Input:
; EAX = integer value to convert
; ESI = pointer to buffer to store the string in (must have room for at least 10 bytes)
; Output:
; EAX = pointer to the first character of the generated string
int_to_string:
  add esi,9
  mov byte [esi],0

  mov ebx,10         
.next_digit:
  xor edx,edx         ; Clear edx prior to dividing edx:eax by ebx
  div ebx             ; eax /= 10
  add dl,'0'          ; Convert the remainder to ASCII 
  dec esi             ; store characters in reverse order
  mov [esi],dl
  test eax,eax            
  jnz .next_digit     ; Repeat until eax==0
  mov eax,esi
  ret

Alternatively, a number in the range 0..9 can be converted to a digit by simply adding '0' to it, and then printed with sys_write by placing the address of the digit in ecx and a 1 in edx.

share|improve this answer
    
i just need to increment a digit. a byte should be enough for that. speaking about chars, i guess i don't need a number conversion here, as '0' incremented by one is '1' anyway, right? – İsmet Alkan Jun 30 '14 at 8:21
    
If you want to keep your variable a byte you need to access it as a byte, e.g. mov cl,[sayi]. I don't see any '0' or '1' in your code, but you could certainly convert a number in the range 0..9 to its corresponding character by adding '0' to it. – Michael Jun 30 '14 at 8:24
    
i resolved the issue by @Damien_The_Unbeliever 's comment, but thanks for your effort. writing assembly as a starter is nasty :) – İsmet Alkan Jun 30 '14 at 8:28
    
The part about sys_write expecting a string address is already covered in my answer: "The sys_write syscall prints whatever ecx points to as a sequence of characters. It doesn't do any conversion from integers to strings, so that's something you'll have to do yourself." – Michael Jun 30 '14 at 8:51

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