Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I read a lot of articles about Singleton, in most of which authors said that this variation of Singleton in Java:

public class Singleton {
    private static Singleton instance = new Singleton();

    private Singleton() {}
    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return instance;
    }
}

is NOT LAZY (EAGER then).

But I can't understand why, Singleton() constuctor will be invoked only on Singleton class initialization. I know several reasons, which can trigger class initialization:

  1. Using new with constructor (but in this case constructor is private).
  2. Accessing or setting up static field (here private).
  3. Using static method.
  4. With reflection: Class.forName("Singleton").

So here our object will be created only on using static method getInstance() (it is still LAZY initialization I guess) and with reflection (but reflection can ruin a lot of Singleton variations, except enum maybe).

Maybe I can't see something obvious, explain me please, where was I wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Your code is an example of lazy creation. As long as there’s no other way of using your class, as you have guessed yourself, it’s created lazily on demand (and using Reflection would be just another way of demanding initialization). So you’re right. – Holger Jun 30 '14 at 9:55
1  
Here is my plan for world domination: 1) Prefer the enum Singleton pattern. 2) Realize that Singletons are a bad idea to begin with, no matter how you implement them. 3) Educate people on stackoverflow why Singletons are a bad idea. 4) Retire and drink Margaritas on the beach. – fredoverflow Jun 30 '14 at 10:17
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Basically it's a matter of degrees of laziness. It's lazy in that it won't construct the singleton until the class is initialized, but it's eager in that there could be situations where you want to use the class without initializing the singleton itself.

For example:

public final class Singleton {
    private static final Singleton instance = new Singleton();

    private Singleton() {}

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return instance;
    }

    public static void sayHello() {
        System.out.println("Hello!");
    }
}

Calling Singleton.sayHello() will instantiate the singleton even if we don't want it to... so it's not as lazy as it could be.

You can get round this using a nested type:

public final class Singleton {
    private Singleton() {}

    public static Singleton getInstance() {
        return Holder.instance;
    }

    public static void sayHello() {
        System.out.println("Hello!");
    }

    private static class Holder {
        private static final Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
}

Now Singleton.Holder will only be initialized by using the getInstance method. It's lazy and thread-safe with no locking.

In my experience, usually a singleton class's only static method is the getInstance method, in which case they're equivalent (assuming you don't use reflection to initialize the type somehow, for example).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I agree with you. But do we need other static methods in Singleton? So summary: without other static methods it's lazy, but with other static methods it's eager, right? – marshall Jun 30 '14 at 9:54
    
Yeah I think this is the most agreeable answer. Its a mighty difficult one though, what really throws off this question is that it is a singleton and thus has a reference to itself. That already makes it a bit vague what exactly the word "lazy" refers to here... lazy instantiation or lazy initialization? In the context of a singleton it is usually architecturally one and the same :/ – Gimby Jun 30 '14 at 9:55
2  
@marshall: Well, with other static methods it's "eager when those other methods are called". Not the same as eager in terms of "when the app starts up" for example. Personally I'd try to avoid using a singleton anyway, in most cases :) – Jon Skeet Jun 30 '14 at 9:55
    
I avoid, it too: It does not look nice, if you have to add an static method resetSingleton() for unit tests, that uses reflection to reset the instance field – AlexWien Jun 30 '14 at 10:03

It is not lazy because the singeton object is created once the class is loaded.
A lazy Singleton would create the object when it is first used.

share|improve this answer
2  
But class will loaded only on getInstance() method, as I said in my Question. You didn't read or maybe disagree with me? Tell me why please, I can't understand. – marshall Jun 30 '14 at 9:45
    
The class could be loaded of you reference it. E.g Singleton theSingleton; – AlexWien Jun 30 '14 at 9:53
2  
I disagree with you. Singleton theSingleton won't load the class. – marshall Jun 30 '14 at 9:55
    
@marshall: It may load the class but not initialize it. That may be VM-specific... not sure. – Jon Skeet Jun 30 '14 at 9:56
    
At least when you check the singleton later: if (theSingleton instanceof IFastSorter) { ...} else .., It is loaded. – AlexWien Jun 30 '14 at 9:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.